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If We're Bombing Libya, Why Aren't We Bombing Bahrain?

A number of other countries are currently engaged in conflicts that meet Obama's criterion for American intervention. What's keeping us out of them?


In President Obama’s speech on Libya on Monday, he laid out a list of requirements for involvement in foreign matters in which the United States is “not directly threatened, but our interests and values are.” According to his criteria, the U.S. must intervene in nations where:

1. There is a grassroots democratic movement

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Egypt Just Banned Protests? Here's Why

Egypt just banned protests. Is this a sign of the country slipping back into dictatorship? No.


If you're like us, you were quite puzzled when you found out that the Egyptian government today passed a law banning protests, officially making "sit-ins or gatherings that would disrupt work in public or private establishments" punishable by jail time or fines of up to LE500,000 (about $84,000).

Why would a country that just saved itself from a dictatorship with an admirable, awe-inspiring series of nonviolent demonstrations immediately turn around and then ban such demonstrations? Is this a sign of the country slipping back into dictatorship? No. Here's why:

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The Top 10 Ways that Libya 2011 is Not Iraq 2003

Before you go comparing Libya to Iraq and Obama to Bush, you need to read this.


Here are the differences between George W. Bush’s invasion of Iraq in 2003 and the current United Nations action in Libya:

1. The action in Libya was authorized by the United Nations Security Council. That in Iraq was not. By the UN Charter, military action after 1945 should either come as self-defense or with UNSC authorization. Most countries in the world are signatories to the charter and bound by its provisions.

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What If We Had Just Waited for the Iraqis to Topple Hussein?

What if we'd waited for the Iraqis to take back their own country instead of trying to do so ourselves?


With protesters toppling dictators left and right in the Arab world, it turns out that Middle East experts were right in anticipating that the Tunisian and Egyptian uprisings would lead to a "domino effect" in the region. Following a brief visit to Egypt on February 13, Russian envoy to the Middle East Alexander Saltanov said, "The contacts during our visit showed that at least some regional leaders do not expect a swift way out from this phase of development in the Middle East." Adding: "The leaders of these countries and some others believe the process will gain momentum."

And gain momentum it has. Ben Ali is gone in Tunisia, as is Hosni Mubarak in Egypt. In Bahrain, protesters continue to violently clash with Prime Minister Khalifa ibn Salman Al Khalifa, while in Libya, Muammar Gaddafi has taken to bombing his own citizens in an effort to squelch their revolt. Even people in Iran, who faced rampant arrests and death during post-election protests in 2009, are back on the streets, once again risking their lives to kick out the iron-fisted regime.

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