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Don’t Get Mad … But Your Anger May Not Have Much To Do With Your Health

A new study shows that Asian societies do not experience the same anger-poor health link prevalent among Western populations

Heather Cho, the disgraced Korean Air vice president who resigned after she angrily demanded a plane return to its gate at John F. Kennedy airport due to the way she was served nuts onboard, is used as an example of the anger-high status link in Asian cultures

For some cultures, expressing your anger is linked to good health. Published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, a new study tracks Japanese and American subjects, studying their cardiovascular health and inflammation markers as well as their anger. What results is a clear distinction. Americans with greater expression of anger tend to have a higher biological health risk, while Japanese with higher anger expression enjoy a lower biological health risk.

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Follow Their Lead? Most Chinese Believe Their Students Are Overworked

In China, where suicide is the leading cause of death among young people, 68 percent of adults say kids are overworked.


Discussions about the future of the United States' education system often are colored by fears that students from China and India are outperforming their American peers and soon will swoop in and take their jobs. In a speech last January in which he trumpeted the importance of science, technology, engineering, and math education, President Obama praised the way China and India are "educating their children earlier and longer, with greater emphasis on math and science." He then said that America needed to "out-educate" our competitors to the east.

According to a new study from the Pew Research Center, significant portions of the population in China, India, and Pakistan believe their children are being pushed too hard in school. In China, where suicide is the leading cause of death among young people, a full 68 percent of people say adults put too much pressure on children to do well in school.

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Dubai Student Designs Mobile Prenatal Care Device

This 20-year-old Dubai student's new mobile device could make childbirth much safer in developing countries.

It’s not hard to guess from his technology competition name—The Hex Pistols—that 20-year-old Shawn Frank is a fan of music. He's also a strong advocate of ensuring that women in developing nations have access to quality prenatal care. Six months ago, while walking to an internship, Frank came up with the idea for momEcare, a mobile device that helps provide medical assistance to pregnant women who can't get to a hospital. Now Frank, who just graduated from the computer science program at the University of Wollongong in Dubai, is headed to Microsoft's Imagine Cup, a technology competition for socially conscious high school and college students happening next week in New York City (we've covered the other young finalists here, here and here). I caught up with him to find out what first sparked his interest in technology and learn more about how momEcare works.

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Why India is the Breeding Ground for World Saving Innovations

Historically, products have been created in the developed world and then move to poorer nations. But recent "indovations" are reversing that path.


What is an "indovation?” As the name implies, an indovation is an innovation developed in India but the world would be wise to take note because India's mix of size, developing markets and geographic identity make the subcontinent fertile ground for world changing ideas and products. The point is to create more at less cost for more people.

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