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Beach Resorts Are Destroying the World’s Beaches

Researchers predict that the beaches will be gone in as soon as 50 years.

Coastal development is not only making beaches less accessible, it’s destroying the coast all together. Researchers in the U.K. and the U.S. warn that real estate development is slowly eroding shorelines around the world. In a new book called The Last Beach, professor Andrew Cooper of the University of Ulster and professor Orrin Pilkey of Duke University warn that the construction of sea walls around beach developements are impeding the natural movement of water and sand. Beaches act as a natural defense against the force of ocean waves. Sea walls, however, don’t absorb those forces as effectively as beaches do.

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Can Your Beach Vacation Make You Sick?

When I started visiting our Santa Monica office, I was thrilled to get up early (I was on East Coast time) and go down to the beach to body...

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When I started visiting our Santa Monica office, I was thrilled to get up early and go down to the beach to body surf. It was well worth braving the cold water, because sometimes I’d be joined by a dolphin or sea lion. My California colleagues, however, were not so enthusiastic about my morning swim. Polluted water from storm drains, they warned me, contaminated the beach in some places. Rashes, pinkeye, stomach bugs, respiratory infections, meningitis, hepatitis—any one of these can strike an unlucky beachgoer who gets into dirty water. In fact, researchers have estimated that across Southern California, anywhere from 600,000 to four million beachgoers come down with a gastrointestinal ailment each year.

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End Plastic Pollution: Pick it Up. Bin it. Take Three for the Sea

Take 3 calls upon citizens to take 3 pieces of trash with them when they leave the beach, waterway or…anywhere!

Plastic… it’s everywhere. We sit on it, we eat from it, we spend with it, we wear it, we complete surgery with it. In fact, the device you’re reading this from now probably has plastic in it. The uses for plastic are endless. This remarkable substance has quite literally shaped our future—we live in the “Age of Plastic.”

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Ventura Beach Retreats from Damage of Rising Seas

A bike path and parking lot in Ventura, California, will retreat 65 feet inland to escape rising sea levels. Expect more of this.


The Los Angeles Times reports that the beach known as Surfer's Point in Ventura, California, has begun a process of "managed retreat" from the ocean. A bike path and 120-spot parking lot—which, incidentally charges only $2 for entire days at the beach—currently face significant erosion from rising sea levels, so construction crews will move them 65 feet inland.

The effort by the city of Ventura is the most vivid example to date of what may lie ahead in California as coastal communities come to grips with rising sea levels and worsening coastal erosion. As the coastline creeps inland, scouring sand from beaches or eating away at coastal bluffs, landowners will increasingly be forced to decide whether to spend vast sums of money fortifying the shore or give up and step back. State officials say the $4.5-million project in Ventura is the first of its kind in California and could serve as a model for threatened sites along the coast.

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