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Angelina Jolie Discusses Removal of Her Ovaries and Fallopian Tubes

The humanitarian and filmmaker shares the latest development in her journey to minimize her cancer risk.

Image via Georges Biard/Wikimedia Commons.

Today, Angelina Jolie penned an op-ed for the New York Times frankly discussing her recent surgery to remove her ovaries and fallopian tubes. The operation carried the added weight of kickstarting early menopause despite the hormone replacements Jolie has been taking. It was the latest development in Jolie’s commitment to publicly sharing her courageous efforts to preemptively minimize her chances for cancer, ever since a blood test revealed that she carried the “faulty” BRCA1 gene, which gave Jolie “an estimated 87 percent risk of breast cancer and a 50 percent risk of ovarian cancer.” The humanitarian, filmmaker, and mother of six has been incredibly forthright in disclosing the details of her difficult journey with the world, including the decision to undergo a double mastectomy two years ago. Post-procedure, Jolie reported in another NYT op-ed that her breast cancer risk had “dropped from 87 percent to under 5 percent.”

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Germany’s Blind Breast Cancer Detectors

Braille readers are able to detect tumors much earlier than most doctors and women performing self-exams.

Science shows that many good ideas occur while in the shower. One morning, Frank Hoffman, a German doctor, was struck by the thought: would blind women do his job better than him?

It’s fairly well known that blind people trained to read Braille have a highly developed sense of touch, even more so than their counterparts who do not read Braille. Hoffmann hypothesized that blind and visually-impaired women might be the best candidates to carry out breast examinations on patients, which depends on searching for small irregularities in breast tissue.

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Thanks for the Mammaries

Inspired by her breast cancer, artist Bettina Hubby organizes an irreverent art show.

Thanks for the Mammaries installation shot. Photo by Steven Rimlinger

It’s already heartbreaking enough to be diagnosed with Stage 1 breast cancer as Los Angeles-based artist Bettina Hubby was last January. But Hubby found that the toughest thing was the dour reactions of her friends, all of whom treated Hubby’s recovery with kid gloves or, worse, pity. To break the ice, the fun-loving Hubby started a Facebook page dedicated to bosom humor.

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Give Komen the Pink Slip: Five Ways to Support Women's Health for All

The omnipresent Susan G. Komen Foundation has pulled its grants for breast-cancer screenings from Planned Parenthood.


News broke Tuesday afternoon that the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation, the omnipresent charity battling breast cancer, is pulling hundreds of thousands of dollars' worth of grants it had awarded Planned Parenthood to fund cancer screenings. The official reason? A new rule forbids the organization from funding any group currently under investigation in Congress. (Planned Parenthood is being investigated by legislators who oppose abortion rights and want to make doubly sure federal funds aren't being used for abortions). But many assume Komen caved to anti-abortion activists, and possibly to anti-choice higher-ups within the foundation.

At best, this decision is spineless. At worst, it's cruel. Rescinding the Planned Parenthood funding implies that the only women who deserve to receive breast cancer screenings are those who can afford a private doctor. Three million women and men visited Planned Parenthood last year. Over the past five years, Susan G. Komen allowed the health centers to provide nearly 170,000 breast exams and 6,400 mammogram referrals.

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