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We Need to Talk About The Homeless Perception Problem

DePaul UK’s Street Corners ad is the latest in a collective campaign against how people perceive the homeless.

Today’s society has a tendency to disparage the homeless, and it is becoming one of our most divisive, broken, and visibly apparent faults. The way some people’s minds immediately jump to conclusions, diagnosing complete strangers down on their luck with drug problems, alcoholism, and bad judgment is an obstacle in the way of giving aid to those who need it the most.

DePaul UK, a group with the mission of helping the homeless and disadvantaged, started a Street Corners campaign to promote its Nightstop program, in which homeless young people aged 16-25 are matched with a volunteer host.

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Intermission: Campaign Ads Dating Back to 1952, All In One Place

Mushroom clouds, scary prisoners, little girls picking daisies: take a tour through some 300 presidential ads from the past 15 election cycles.

The Washington Post has one of the most comprehensive breakdowns of who's spending what for what kind of message on your television airwaves this election cycle. But in the memory lane department, the folks over at The Museum of the Moving Image have assembled a wonderful archive of Presidential campaign ads dating back to 1952 in a collection they've called The Living Room Candidate.

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Super PAC App: Your Pocket Political Lie Detector

MIT Media Lab grads roll out a tool for separating truth from fiction during a deluge of Super PAC funded campaign ads.


With Romney now the official Republican presidential nominee, and the election season in full steam, expect to see an ambush of political ads on television. How to cut through the noise and pull back the veil? The newly released "Super PAC App" aims to put fact-checking at your fingertips with "objective, third-party information"about who paid for the ad and at what price, and whether those claims are indeed based on facts.

Created by Jennifer Hollet and Dan Siegel as a class project at MIT's Media Lab, the free Super Pac App uses audio recognition technology similar to Shazam, enabling iPhone-users to identify the ad by funding organization and amount spent. It then directs them to nonpartisan sources like FactCheck.org and PolitiFact to see details about the veracity of the ad's claims.

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