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Talking Hands Provide Perfect Summary of the Cancun Climate Talks

This goofy two-minute video by some British kids does a better job explaining the overall arc of the Cancun climate talks than most mainstream media.

Remember those big United Nations climate change talks in Cancun? They came and went without all that much attention or coverage here in the United States, and you'd be forgiven for not knowing exactly what happened. (Though we did devote quite a few posts to the meetings, including some great insider accounts and a big reaction roundup.) The truth is, international negotiations are absurdly confusing—what with the acronyms and "non-papers" and bizarre diplomatic protocol— and practically impenetrable to all but the dedicated few who routinely attend these events and immerse themselves in the UNFCCC.

It's perhaps fitting then that the best overall roundup I've found of the Cancun climate talks comes in the form of a goofy two-minute video of "talking hands" put together by a bunch of youth climate activists.

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Money Talks: The $15-trillion Investors Taking on Climate Change COP16 Climate Change Policy Demanded by Investor Group Worth $15 Trillion

A group of investors-collectively worth as much as the U.S. GDP-have signed a United Nations call for a coordinated climate policy.


A group of investors—collectively worth as much as the GDP of the United States—have signed a United Nations statement calling for a coordinated international policy on climate change. Their message, as you'd expect from the stewards of $15 trillion, isn't moral so much as it is economic. Specifically, the investors argue that a damaged planet will hurt business, and they estimate as much as a 20 percent drop in GDP by 2050 if action isn't taken to shift investments to low-carbon technologies.

Signatories of the statement come from 259 organizations on every continent except Antarctica. Major international banks, like HSBC and Alianz, joined with the U.N. Environment Program, a dozen U.S. pension funds, and developing world investment firms and banks.

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