GOOD

Why the Norway Shooter May End Up Serving A Life Sentence

Anders Breivik isn't going to jail for 21 years, but he won't be executed either. His countrymen tell us they prefer a less "medieval" punishment.

The body count in the wake of Friday's killing spree in Norway is now at 76, fewer than the 93 deaths that were initially reported but still a ghastly total. In a country that boasted only 0.6 intentional homicides per 100,000 citizens in 2009 (compared to America's 5 per 100,000), this is easily the most devastating killing it has faced since World War II. The only suspect in police custody, Anders Behring Breivik, has admitted to the attacks but also pleaded not guilty, saying he was not criminally responsible.

Keep Reading
Articles

People Are Awesome: Muslim Hate-Crime Victim Petitions to Save His Attacker's Life

A white supremacist killer is set to die in Texas on Wednesday. Not if one of his victims has anything to say about it.


In the three weeks following the 9/11 attacks, Dallas white supremacist Mark Stroman set out on a mission to kill Muslim men. Later he said he was angry that government officials "hadn't done their job, so he was going to do it for them." Four days after the World Trade Center fell, Stroman killed Waqar Hasan, a 46-year-old Pakistani man, with a gunshot to the head in Hasan's convenience store. Six days after that he shot Rais Bhuiyan in the face at a gas station. Bhuiyan went blind in one eye, but survived. Lastly, on October 4, Stroman shot Vasudev Patel, an Indian immigrant who was Hindu, killing him instantly. Stroman was caught after killing Patel and has since pleaded guilty to his crimes.

Under Texas' notoriously strict capital punishment laws, Stroman was sentenced to death. He is set to be killed by lethal injection on Wednesday. It turns out, however, that one of the biggest opponents of his death sentence is also the most unlikely: Bhuiyan, Stroman's sole surviving victim.

Keep Reading
Articles

California Takes a Step Towards Executing People Again

Judge Jeremy Fogel is heading back to San Quentin to see if the execution facility there is, er, up to snuff.


Five years ago, San Jose federal judge Jeremy Fogel shut down executions in California when he found that the facility in San Quentin was rife with problems. It was small, poorly lit, and too cramped to allow the workers carrying out the procedure to see what they were doing.

Today, Fogel is heading back to San Quentin to see if the state's new facility (pictured above) is, er, up to snuff.

Keep Reading
Articles