GOOD

College Students Are Awesome: Meet the Man Who's Tutoring Low-Income Students for Free

John Stamm is offering free tutoring to low-income students in Kansas City.


When a student from a wealthy family doesn’t understand an academic concept, it’s common for her parents to hire tutors to help her get up to speed. But what happens to students from lower-income backgrounds whose families don’t have the cash to pay for the extra help?

John Stamm, a 20-year-old student at the University of Missouri, Kansas City began to ask himself just that question while working part-time at a for-profit tutoring company. That access to tutoring is tied to families' ability to pay bothered him so much that Stamm decided to quit his job and start his own nonprofit venture. Now his organization, Achievement Tutors is working with low-income students throughout Kansas City.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Irish Students Design Software to Make Drivers Safer

More than  3,000 people die every day because of traffic accidents, and that number is on the rise. The problem's so bad that the World Health...

More than 3,000 people die every day because of traffic accidents, and that number is on the rise. The problem's so bad that the World Health Organization predicts that by 2020, car accidents will be the third leading cause of disease or injury. But what if computer software could help prevent many of them by evaluating a driver's behind-the-wheel behavior and educating her about it?

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Will a Harvard Professor's New Technology Make College Lectures a Thing of the Past?

Thanks to Learning Catalytics, the "flipped classroom" and peer learning could revolutionize higher education.


Another sign that the college lecture might be dying: Harvard University physics professor Eric Mazur is championing the "flipped classroom," a model where information traditionally transferred during lectures is learned on a student's own time, and classroom time is spent discussing and applying knowledge to real-world situations. To make it easy for professors to transition out of lecture mode, Mazur has developed Learning Catalytics, an interactive software that enables them to make the most of student interactions and maximize the retention of knowledge.

Mazur sold attendees at the recent Building Learning Communities conference on this new approach by first asking them to identify something they're good at, and then having them explain how they mastered it. After the crowd shared, Mazur pointed out that no one said they'd learned by listening to lectures. Similarly, Mazur said, college students don't learn by taking notes during a lecture and then regurgitating information. They need to be able to discuss concepts, apply them to problems and get real-time feedback. Mazur says Learning Catalytics enables this process to take place.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles