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Is the Beer You’re Drinking Problematic?

It doesn’t have to be that way.

Illustration by Tyler Hoehne

Mike Babb was born in Golden, Colorado, in the shadow of the monolithic Coors Brewing Company. He worked at Coors for 20 years, the third generation of his family to do so. During what he calls a sabbatical, he went to Weihenstephan, part of the Technical University of Munich in Germany, where he learned the craft of a master brewer. After teaching at the Siebel Institute, a prestigious brewing program in Chicago, Babb relocated to Michigan. He helped design a new joint higher education degree program at the Kalamazoo Valley Community College and Western Michigan University that’s set to kick off later this year: a four-year Bachelor’s degree in sustainable brewing. The first 30 credit hours at KVCC will give the students a brewing certificate, with hands on classes in an experimental brewing kitchen, along with an associate’s degree that they can transfer to WMU for a more rigorous scientific focus in the second two years.

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Now There's a WikiLeaks for Colleges

UniLeaks wants to expose shady dealings at the world's universities. Get ready to submit those secret emails, memos and contracts.


Can a WikiLeaks-style site keep colleges and universities transparent and honest in their dealings? That's the hope of a brand new Australia-based website, UniLeaks, which hopes to create a safe space for people around the world to leak information about back-door shenanigans going on at their schools. The anonymous founders state that they were inspired to create the site after witnessing the "creative forms of resistance" young people in the United Kingdom took in response to government austerity measures.

According to the site's "Who We Are" section, they'll accept anonymously submitted "restricted or censored material of political, ethical, diplomatic or historical significance which is in some way connected to higher education, an agency or government body working in partnership with an institution, e.g., a university." That means they want those private emails between professors, copies of shady contracts, secret research, and internal memos. Whistle-blowers can upload their documents through an encryption-free electronic drop box. The site's journalists then turn them into news stories.

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