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Emma Sulkowicz Stands Behind Her Controversial New Anti-Rape Video

“The Mattress Performance” sparked a national dialogue about rape. But the artist’s latest project shows there’s so much more to be said.

Image via Wikimedia

Almost a year ago, Emma Sulkowicz, then a student at Columbia University, started lifting her dorm mattress every day to class. Her actions mystified some, but for Sulkowicz, the concept was simple: every day her rapist remained protected and in school, she would lift. Sulkowicz’s project received national attention and started a national dialogue, and now the artist has come out with yet another powerful project, entitled “This is Not a Rape.”

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The New York Brain Bank is Like the Walmart of Brains

This 5,000-brain collection is changing the game for scientists who study neurodegenerative disease

Photo courtesy of aboutmodafinil.com

If you’re looking for brains, at the New York Brain Bank, they got brains. Within the subterranean facility, which lies beneath a Children’s Hospital in Washington Heights, scientists have access to a collection of more than 5,000 preserved human brains with neurodegenerative disease. As people live longer, the chances of an individual developing one of these diseases—Alzheimer’s particularly—increases, and research into causes and treatments for neurodegenerative conditions has become more important than ever. The stockpile is linked to a database, where a researcher can input a specific tissue or condition, and receive directions to one of 10 enormous brain freezers. The whole brain attainment process takes about five business days from the initial request.

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The Coming Paradigm Shift in Education Reform

Instead of ignoring the role poverty plays in hindering student achievement, the next wave of reformers might tackle it head on.

If you hang out with people in the education world long enough you'll quickly find that bringing up the connection between poverty and poor student achievement can start a heated debate. While researchers, wonks, and politicians tacitly acknowledge the effect of poverty on students, the reform conversation usually focuses on school-centered solutions—modifying teacher tenure or creating common education standards, for example. But a national working group, the “Futures of School Reform,” a three-year-old collaboration of 20 prominent education experts brought together by Harvard's School of Education, says the era of reformers discounting poverty could be coming to an close.

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Twilight Is Now Required Reading for a College Level Honors English Class

An honors English course at Ohio State University is including Twilight as required reading. Does Edward Cullen belong in college?


Parents paying $19,584 a year for their kids to attend Ohio State University might not be thrilled. Twilight is required reading for English 261H, a spring 2011 honors "introduction to fiction" course.

According to Associate Professor Amanpal Garcha's syllabus, the class will read and discuss "important, influential narratives about the supernatural—Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Bram Stoker’s Dracula, Henry James’ The Turn of the Screw, and Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight as well a few minor works."

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Grading on Campus: Is the Easy A Here to Stay?

Leaked data at Columbia University shows plenty of students are getting A's. Is it grade inflation, or is everyone really just that smart?


Remember the days when college students fantasized about being tech savvy enough to hack the campus computer system and change their GPA to a 4.0? For students at Columbia University, A's come easily—no hacking necessary. According to leaked stats obtained by the school's student paper, the Spectator, professors gave A's and A-pluses to 8 percent of undergrads. Is it grade inflation, or are Columbia's students really just that smart?

The Spectator obtained a spreadsheet with data on 482 students, including their class years, majors, and academic advisers, when a dean mistakenly emailed it to students. According to the data, economics, English, and history majors are more likely to rack up A's, as are seniors.

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