GOOD

It's easy to become calloused to everyday headlines with messages like, "the world is ending" and "everything is going extinct." They're so prevalent, in fact, that the severity of these statements has completely diminished to the point that no one pays them any attention. This environmental negativity (coined "eco-phobia") has led us to believe that all hope is lost for wildlife. But luckily, that isn't the case.

Historically, we have waited until something is near the complete point of collapse, then fought and clawed to bring the species numbers back up. But oftentimes we wait so long that it's too late. Creatures vanish from the Earth altogether. They go extinct. And even though I don't think for a single second that we should downplay the severity of extinction, if we can flip this on its head and show that every once in a while a species we have given up on is actually still out there, hanging on by a thread against all odds, that is a story that deserves to be told. A tragic story of loss becomes one about an animal that deserves a shot at preservation and a message of hope the world deserves to hear.

As a wildlife biologist and tracker who has dedicated his life to the pursuit of animals I believe have been wrongfully deemed extinct, I spend most of my time in super remote corners of the Earth, hoping to find some shred of evidence that these incredible creatures are still out there. And to be frank, I'm pretty damn good at it!

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The Planet
Photo by Thomas Kelley on Unsplash

It's fun to go to a party, talk to strangers, and try to guess where they're from just by their accents and use of language. It's called 'soda' on the East Coast and 'pop' in the Midwest, right? Well, it looks like a new study has been able to determine where a Humpback whale has been and who he's been hanging out with during his awesome travels just from his song.

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Science

Eden Reforestation Projects (Eden) — a non-profit organization whose mission is to provide poverty relief by employing local villagers in Haiti, Madagascar, and Nepal to help with reforestation — recently announced they've planted 250 million trees around the world.

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Articles

This Boot Camp Trains Young People To Fight Plastic Pollution

Youth activists ages 11 to 18 help educate their communities about how to curb an environmental crisis.

Hrilina Ramrakhiani and other participants take part in an activity called “Love Letters to the Sea." Photo by Emy Kane/Lonely Whale.

The impact of young people’s activism has not gone unnoticed. From 16-year-old Jamie Margolin leading to July 21’s Zero Hour youth climate marches in Washington, D.C., to the lawsuit Juliana v. United States filed on behalf of 21 youths suing the government for failing to address climate change — youth are leading the way on climate action.

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8 Ways Resigning EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt Suppressed Science

11 members of Pruitt’s EPA’s board have a history of downplaying the health risks of secondhand smoke, air pollution, and other hazards.

Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt attends a White House picnic for military families. Photo by Alex Brandon/AP.

Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt, who announced on July 5 that he is resigning, leaves a legacy of suppressing the role of science at the agency.

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Photo by Jean-Christophe Verhaegen/Getty Images.

THE GOOD NEWS:

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