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Retweet to Rebuild: Social Media Helps Clean Up London Post-Riots

Don't blame social media for the London riots. Facebook and Twitter helped rioters organize, but they're helping support the cleanup effort as well.


"Everyone watching these horrific actions will be struck by how they were organized via social media," said British Prime Minister David Cameron, referring to the riots in London that caused more than 200 million pounds in damages. Cameron said he's considering a selective ban on "using social media for violence," a suggestion some have called censorship, akin to cracking down on the telephone when people use it to discuss violent crimes.

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How to Save Multiculturalism

"Multiculturalism" isn't a bad word. Embracing the differences diverse people bring to the table can create endless educational opportunities.


U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron just reignited the debate on "multiculturalism," joining ranks with German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Sarkozy by declaring their multicultural policies a "failure." As a U.S. passport carrying, multilingual, daughter of immigrants, and as a mother of aspiring global citizens, such a defeat felt like a kick in the gut. In my travels speaking to diverse audiences on gaining a global perspective and the tools contained in my book, Growing Up Global: Raising Children to Be At Home in the World, I’ve seen quite the opposite: individuals of varied backgrounds coming together to raise beautiful families, make friends across cultural and ideological lines, and take tangible steps toward building a better world for their children.

Upon closer review, David Cameron’s justification for the failure of multiculturalism seemed reasonable: "Under the doctrine of state multiculturalism, we have encouraged different cultures to live separate lives, apart from each other and apart from the mainstream." Speaking specifically of radical Muslim youth, Cameron argued this resulted in marginalization, rootlessness, and "behaving in ways that run completely counter to our values."

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The Silent Song That Might Top British Charts

A song supporting Britan's veterans is two minutes of silence. Help it get to the top of the charts.

This isn't your usual charity single. In honor of Remembrance Day, the British version of Veteran's Day, the British Royal Legion has put together a song whose proceeds will go toward disabled British Veterans. The song is two minutes of silence.

Remembrance Day is November 18, and traditionally features two minutes of silence at 11 a.m. local time. The British Royal Legion is hoping they can get the song to top the charts next week. You can help by buying a copy of it for only one pound (and downloading the star-studded video, featuring famous Brits like Thom Yorke, David Cameron, and Andy Murray. There is a preview below.)

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