GOOD

No, Black Folk Can't Ask for Help

I am black, feared and barely tolerated.

"Black folk can't ask for help." This is the sadness and caution I live with. This is the ethic, mantra and reality that I may die to. The recent killing of Renisha McBride might have inspired this particular essay, but high-profile cases of Jonathan Farrel, Trayvon Martin, Trayon Christian as well as countless taken lives who don't receive a tweet remind me that I'm presumed to be a black menace who has been given less than a benefit of doubt that I'm human.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Do These Men Wearing Their Girlfriends' Clothes Explore Equality?

In the series "The Men Under the Influence," Spanish photographer Jon Uriarte sought to explore changing gender norms.

Now more than ever, our notion of traditional gender roles is being turned on its head. In the series "The Men Under the Influence," Spanish photographer Jon Uriarte sought to explore these changing norms, and the resulting confusion men experience as their responsibilities are revisited within relationships. Over the course of three years Uriarte traveled around Spain and the U.S. to photograph heterosexual males in their girlfriend's clothes.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uWSxzjyMNpU
What would you say if we told you that the human mind is the real frontline in the battle to end poverty? What about if we said anti-poverty organizations need to spend a lot more effort understanding the cognitive sciences, rather than focussing exclusively on researching vaccines, micro-finance and even opinion polling? And that a good place to start is with the idea of common sense?
If there is anything that epitomizes the concept of simple truth, common sense is it. Merriam-Webster describes it as "sound and prudent judgment based on a simple perception of the situation or facts.”
But contemporary research in cognitive science tells us that, rather than being a simple objective thing, common sense is actually a highly complex, largely invisible and inherently subjective collection of subconscious mechanisms, assumptions, experiences and perceptions. This means, however well educated or dispassionate we strive to be, because we rely on our common sense, we are always and forever prone to selective understanding and irrational, emotional judgments.
To date, precious little work has been done to study common sense when it comes to inequality and poverty. We helped prepare the Finding Frames report that looked at this question in the British context, and have commissioned some top-line research into global common sense, but so much more needs to be done.
What is clear from preliminary studies is that what counts as common sense around poverty in the UK, and very possibly across the Global North, is not encouraging. In summary, most people conceive of global poverty as synonymous with “aid,” which is seen as an act of charity. Charity, in turn, rests on the interaction between a powerful giver—be that an individual or a nation—and a grateful receiver. Agency resides almost exclusively with the powerful givers; the grateful receivers are simply understood as poor, needy, and without control over their own destiny. Further, in global settings, “the poor” are understood as an undifferentiated group without intrinsic strength, often referred to through the shorthand of “Africa,” where nothing ever changes.
This won’t surprise most people who live in the Global South (another label that tends to cluster people into a category of anonymity). When you are on the receiving end of judgmental or paternalistic frames, you can feel it. What might be more surprising is what we found when we looked at the global picture.
The need for a creation story\n

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

#LOVEISLOVE VIDEO: An LGBT Timeline

In light of today's Supreme Court ruling on gay marriage, here is a look back at the trials and tribulations the LGBT community has endured.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

A Post to Facebook: End Pages that Glorify Rape

A letter to Facebook calls for an effort to “recognize speech that trivializes or glorifies violence against girls and women as hate speech."


In December, three male teenagers allegedly filmed themselves raping a 12-year-old girl while holding her at gunpoint. The video was then posted to Facebook, which led to prosecutors filing sexual assault charges on the three Chicago area teens. Sadly, this isn't the first story of this kind. In August of 2012, after a high school girl was sexually assaulted in Steubenville, Ohio, pictures and messages about the attack were posted to Twitter, Facebook and YouTube as the county reacted in horror.

The most recent episode has prompted a letter in response from Women, Action, & the Media, the Everyday Sexism Project, and writer Soray Chemaly in asking Facebook to take action. More than 40 other groups and agencies have signed on to the letter, which calls on Facebook to “recognize speech that trivializes or glorifies violence against girls and women as hate speech,” and “train moderators to recognize and remove gender-based hate speech,” among other items aimed at quieting an environment where content making light of or encouraging domestic violence or rape has found a standing.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Sweden Has the Gender Neutral Pronoun Issue Figured Out, Why Can't We?

If you needed more evidence that Sweden is a leader when it comes to just about anything progressive, this week there's more evidence to back that up.

Need more evidence that Sweden is a leader when it comes to just about anything progressive? Slate reports that the Scandanavian country has introduced the groundbreaking word "hen" into the national vocabulary which could have significant implications on gender relations, in a nation already known for an emphasis on equality. Hen, which was added to Sweden's National Encyclopedia is now the most gender neutral pronoun around, making it possible to refer to someone other than by saying he [han in Swedish] or she [hon].

Keep Reading Show less
Articles