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Meet the World's First Solar Powered Study Lantern

Thanks to this solar lantern, for less than $10, students living without electricity could have light to study by when the sun goes down.

When I was in high school, I accidentally set my bed on fire. I needed to finish reading a chapter for English class, but my parents had a pretty strict “lights out” time. So I took a light bulb, screwed it into a socket, plugged it into an extension cord, and dragged it under the covers. Predictably, I fell asleep without shutting this contraption off, and the hot bulb ended up burning my sheets and starting a small, smoky fire. Although my lack of reading light was due to my parent's rules, when the sun goes down around the globe, millions of children that need to study don't even have electricity. The d-light S1, above, is the world's first solar powered lantern made specifically for students trying to hit the books when there's no easily available light source.

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Is Everyone Destined to Cheat?

Two hundred business school students recently admitted to cheating on a midterm after listening to their professor's plea to come forward. Would you?


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After listening to the above lecture by their professor, Richard Quinn, 200 business students in a class of 600 at the University of Central Florida recently admitted to cheating on their midterm exam. The discovery of widespread cheating left Quinn, "physically ill, absolutely disgusted, completely disillusioned, and trying to figure out what the last 20 years was for."

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This 8th Grade Exam From the 1930s Is Really Hard

Where are the multiple choice questions?


Earlier this week, Valerie Strauss over at The Washington Post's Answer Sheet blog posted an exam given to eighth grade students in West Virginia in 1931. They had to pass it in order to graduate.

This is just the geography section of the test, which also included parts addressing penmanship, physiology & hygiene, grammar, arithmetic, civics, and agriculture. Note the lack of multiple choice questions, as well as the practicality and specificity of the exam with regards to where the students lived. I'm not sure anyone today who grew up outside of West Virginia would even have a shot at passing it.

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