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Don’t Call It a Mosque

From women-only congregations to the Tumblr Imam, a new generation of Muslim Americans is practicing Islam their own way.

If you had told me, five or 10 years ago, that in the near future I’d find myself standing among an all-female Muslim congregation in a former synagogue-turned-multifaith space in East Los Angeles, I would have had trouble believing you. Five years ago, the idea of a women-only mosque seemed like an impossibility—the kind of project that would suffer far harsher criticism than it was worth.

But just last month, I prayed my Friday prayers as the California sunlight streamed in through stained-glass windows bearing the Star of David, standing side by side with other Muslim women from all over Los Angeles County. Edina Lekovic, a representative from the Muslim Public Affairs Council and a prominent public figure in the local Muslim community, offered the Women’s Mosque of America its inaugural sermon, or “khutbah,” standing at a podium between two banners bearing the name of God and his Prophet, Mohammad.

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If you were on the Internet at all this past weekend, you probably caught a glimpse of Reza Aslan’s now viral interview with Fox News host Laura Green. The segment plays more like an interrogation, as Green begins the interview asking Aslan why he, as a Muslim, would be interested in the life of Jesus, the founder of Christianity. Aslan, who has studied theology for more than 20 years and holds multiple degrees—including a Ph.D in religion—repeatedly references his academic background to Green, but to no avail. The Fox News host continues to badger him with questions about his faith and his motives for writing the book. In the clip, Green appears unable to understand how Aslan could be capable of writing objectively on the subject of Jesus—or be trusted to deliver an account of his life, degrees or no degree.

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Connecting Beyond Creed Through Multimedia and Social Justice

Faith in Action DC is breaking down the barriers between religious communities, one neighborhood at a time.


When I was a kid, my family would regularly make the long drive down from our home in northern New Jersey to visit family in the Washington D.C. area. As we merged onto the Beltway, just minutes from grandma's house, my parents would whisper to my sisters and me in the back seat of our minivan, "Time to wake up! We're almost there!" Groggily, I'd start to open my eyes. And then, just as I was getting my bearing, I'd see it: The Castle.

Rising above the trees next to the highway, like the Magic Kingdom at the beginning of Disney movies, The Castle stood radiant against the dark sky, adorned with a golden trumpeter hailing our arrival.

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Vatican Climate Warning: "Humans Must Act Decisively Now to Avert a Coming Crisis"

There have been plenty of warnings from religious groups about climate change, but maybe none as dire and direct as these from Vatican.

Catholics, you better start taking climate change seriously. There have been plenty of warnings and pleas from religious and faith-based groups about climate change, but maybe none as dire and direct as these from Vatican.

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Spring Is Packed with Sacred Holidays: Here's What They Teach Us

Many sacred holidays from several traditions converge within the same few weeks of the year. What can we learn from each?

I’m often amazed by the convergence of so many important, sacred holidays within the same few weeks of the year. If a being from a different planet came to earth this week and got a bird’s eye view, I wonder what lessons they would take away from this coming together on the calendar? I doubt they’d take sides—as in “this tradition good, that one is bunk!” All of them ask people to change their routine in honor of something bigger. Here are some lessons they might take away:

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