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Video: Journey of Action Road Trip Stops for City Year San Antonio

Ryan and Kassidy Brown took to the road with their cameras to show that Generation Y is a generation of doers. Naturally they stopped in on City Year.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kdt07yf-8Rk

Ryan and Kassidy Brown, siblings from Nashville, set out together last year on a cross-country exploration of volunteerism. They both have degrees in journalism, so they've been documenting every step of their trip. Recently they dropped in on City Year in San Antonio, Texas, to talk to corps members and the students they are working with at Edward H. White Middle School.

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GOOD Design Daily: Jonathan Safran Foer Die-Cuts One Book into Another

Jonathan Safran Foer used die-cutting to literally carve his new book, Tree of Codes, from the pages of Bruno Schulz's Street of Crocodiles.


The author Jonathan Safran Foer did not write his newest book; he carved it from the pages of another.

To create what Fast Company describes as "an interactive paper sculpture," Foer enlisted the help of the Belgian designer Sara de Bondt and a team from Die Keure, who used the "die-cutting" technique to physically alter the pages of Foer's favorite book, Bruno Schulz's Street of Crocodiles. (I never realized he has such excellent taste.) By cutting out words and lines of text from that book, Foer and his team managed to create an entirely new story.

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In a recent Fast Company editorial, Bruce Nussbaum asks whether humanitarian design is the new imperialism. Citing the partial failure of One Laptop Per Child and what he sees as a presumptuous West-designing-for-the-rest trend in everything from Acumen Fund to IDEO to Emily Pilloton's Project H Design (to which he dedicates much space), Nussbaum worries that well-intentioned design might be "perceived through post-colonial eyes as colonialism."

But should we take a moment now that the movement is gathering speed to ask whether or not American and European designers are collaborating with the right partners, learning from the best local people, and being as sensitive as they might to the colonial legacies of the countries they want to do good in. Do designers need to better see themselves through the eyes of the local professional and business classes who believe their countries are rising as the U.S. and Europe fall and wonder who, in the end, has the right answers? Might Indian, Brazilian and African designers have important design lessons to teach Western designers?

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