GOOD

Are Teachers Overpaid? One Educator Says Yes

What $1,800-per-month paychecks? D.C. teacher Michael Bromley says his peers should stop complaining because they're actually making too much money.

When I hang out with my friends who are teachers, I always offer to pay for whatever it is we're doing. I've been in their shoes so I know they're not exactly rolling in dough. Even U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan recently said that teacher salaries should start at $60,000 and educators should have the opportunity to earn up to $150,000 in merit pay.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Hundreds of Los Angeles Students Walk Out Over Plan to Fire Teachers

Despite a 26 percent dropout rate, students at Huntington Park High School are against a school turnaround plan.


Los Angeles' Huntington Park High School may have a 26 percent dropout rate, but students there protested on Tuesday over a decision to replace at least half of teachers and other campus employees as part of an aggressive school turnaround plan. Despite student opposition, the plan was unanimously approved by the Los Angeles Unified School District board.

One walkout participant told the Los Angeles Times that approximately 300 student protesters gathered in a central area and refused to go to a 10 a.m. class. They then marched seven miles to the district headquarters in Downtown Los Angeles. Another participant named Joey said that students are angry over "both the dismantling of the school and exception that is being made for Libra Academy, a new small school on the edge of campus." Libra's test scores are higher, which is why it's being exempted from the plan, but students "find it very unfair that the adjoined school Libra with its hand-picked higher-achieving students will not be affected by the change."

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

How Do We Break the Pattern of Poor Teaching for Poor Children?

Teaching that encourages creativity and critical thinking is increasingly reserved for affluent children.

Almost every proposal for "school reform" is top-down: divert public money to quasi-private charter schools, pit states against one another in a race for cash, offer rewards when test scores go up, fire the teachers or close the schools when they don't.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles