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For people living in low-lying areas in Southeast Asia, flooding is already a problem—and it will get worse as sea levels rise from climate change. An architecture firm in Vietnam has a new design for housing designed to float when the area floods. The basic, low-cost building is made from local materials like bamboo and leaves, and recycled oil containers at the base make it float. It's constructed using anchors and ties, and can be assembled by the families who will live inside.

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"The Project Flood Is Upon Us": Mississippi River Surge Is a 1-in-500 Year Event

The Mississippi flood happening now is a "Project Flood"—the biggest that could ever occur on the river.

Late Monday night, as we indicated that they might, the Army Corps of Engineers blew up a section of levee on the Mississippi in order to protect the town of Cairo, Illinois from record floods.

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The Pakistani Flood Is Still Causing Devastation

Six months later, Pakistan hasn't recovered from the disaster. You can help.


The photos above show just how large the flood was: the top was before the flood, where you can see the Indus River as a small blue line; the bottom is after the flood, where there are now two very large rivers.

A new photo essay by The Guardian shows how Pakistanis are still reeling from the devastating floods last year. Concerns surrounding food supply are paramount, seeing as many are unable to replant their crops because the land is no longer arable. Homes built out of mud simply melted away, leaving many hungry and homeless. With an increase in food prices many cannot afford to buy food and rely on NGOs. HelpAge International is attempting to look in to how elders are coping with the new situation in a bid to show ways the international community can help.

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Pakistan is basically completely under water right now, but global response to the monsoon-triggered floods has been tepid when compared to, say, the earthquake in Haiti earlier this year. Why? The AP outlines what led to this perfect storm of inaction:

Reasons include the relatively low death toll of 1,500, the slow onset of the flooding compared with more immediate and dramatic earthquakes or tsunamis, and a global "donor fatigue"—or at least a Pakistan fatigue.

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