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Should a Teacher's Value-added Score Be Made Public?

New York City's teachers' union wants to keep teacher performance data from being released. What's to hide?

Should the names of teachers and the test scores of their students be made public? Not according to the United Federation of Teachers, which represents New York City's public school teachers. Earlier today, the union's lawyers presented oral arguments to the New York Supreme Court in Manhattan to keep the New York City Department of Education from giving media outlets the names of teachers and their student's test results

These "Teacher Data Reports" for the city's fourth through eighth grade math and English teachers include what the union calls, "fundamentally flawed" value-added data, "based on the students' standardized test scores, which themselves were found to be inflated and inaccurate."

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New York May Soon Release Teacher Report Cards

On Friday afternoon, the New York City Department of Education may release grades of its 12,000 middle and elementary school teachers.


New York City's school system could soon follow the lead of The Los Angeles Times in releasing value-added data on more than 12,000 teachers who teach either math or English in the city's elementary and middle schools.

The United Federation of Teachers filed suit to keep the city from releasing the data, which it's gathered on its instructors over the last three years and kept internal, according to a report from NY1. The union is looking for the State Supreme Court to grant an injunction, thwarting the city's Department of Education from posting teacher scores online based on how students progress while under their tutelage—mostly assessed via performance on state standardized tests.

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