GOOD

This Lawmaker Wants To Legislate Against Glow-In-The-Dark People

Georgia Rep. Tom Kirby is taking the lead on the pressing issue of human/jellyfish hybrids

image via (cc) flickr user simongoez

Most people, no matter how many times they've read The Island of Doctor Moreau, have more pressing things to worry about than whether or not researchers could eventually augment human physiology with that of, say, a phosphorescent jellyfish. For one Georgia state lawmaker, though, the prospect of human/jellyfish cloning is so troublesome that he’s introduced legislation banning the practice long (long) before anyone (at all) even considers trying it in the first place.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Starting a New Tradition: Georgia Students Hold School's First-Ever Integrated Prom

For the first time ever, black and white students at Wilcox County High School dressed up and danced the night away together.

A group of high school seniors at Wilcox County High School in rural south Georgia made history this past weekend by bucking their community's longstanding tradition of racially segregated proms—yes, one prom for white teens and one for black teens. Indeed, thanks to the inspiring students behind the Integrated Prom movement, for the first time ever, black and white students in the community dressed up and danced the night away together.

How does a community get around having a prom that's open to everyone without violating any civil rights laws? Easy. You just don't let the school sponsor it. After the courts integrated the schools in the area, proms became private, invite-only events. White parents began raising funds for an all-white senior prom, leaving black families with no choice but to follow suit and host proms for their children.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Vintage Racism: The "We Don't Want Trouble" Defense Makes a Comeback

Want proof that "post-racial America" is a myth? Look no further than a timeworn racist excuse.

Back in the Jim Crow days, there were two basic approaches to racism in the segregated South. You were an aggressor—a lawmaker wedded to segregation, a member of a lynch mob, a scientist trying to prove non-white people were inferior, or your garden variety white person who might use a racial epithet. Or you were a bystander—someone who maintained the status quo by saying, "We don't want any trouble."

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Facebook and Privacy: Fired for Beer Photos?

Think your Facebook profile is private? So did former teacher Ashley Payne, till she got fired for posting pictures from a European vacation.


Your Facebook profile is probably full of things that can get you fired. Just ask 24-year-old Ashley Payne, a former English teacher at Apalachee High School in Winder, Georgia. Back in 2009, Payne's principal asked her to resign over a photo taken during a summer European vacation and posted on Facebook. Her story was featured on the most recent episode of the CBS news show 48 hours, "Did the Internet Kill Privacy?" and it spotlights how vulnerable we are—teachers and everyone else—to our online "private" behavior being made public.

In the objectionable photo, Payne has a glass of wine in one hand, and a glass of beer in the other. Her principal, David McGee, claimed that a concerned parent complained about the photo. According to the district, Payne violated warnings about "unacceptable online activities" because the photo "promoted alcohol use," and her page also "contained profanity."

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Should We Ease Kids Into Middle School?

Sixth grade academies are popping up to help students bridge the step up from primary school.


I'm back in my hometown of Atlanta for the week, so naturally I took a gander at the ever-shrinking Atlanta Journal-Constitution. In this past Sunday's issue was an interesting piece on a concept I wasn't aware of: so-called "sixth-grade academies" intended to help kids transition from elementary school to middle school.

Thus far, there are only three of them in the entire state of Georgia, but here's the rationale behind their existence:

Keep Reading Show less
Articles