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Lessons From the Military: What Can Schools Learn From Junior R.O.T.C. Programs?

Ninety-nine percent of students in the Army Junior R.O.T.C. program at Francis Lewis High School in Queens go on to college.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vMliN4xhx_o&feature=player_detailpage
Love or hate the military, there is something to be said about the leadership, discipline, and responsibility it teaches. Those same high expectations are evident at the 17-year-old Army Junior R.O.T.C. program at Francis Lewis High School, a 4,000-student overcrowded school that serves a largely immigrant population in Queens, New York. The New York Times recently profiled the program, and in the video above, you can see it and the 741 cadets enrolled in it in action.

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Are High School Valedictorians Becoming Passé?

Citing an overly competitive school environment, some Kentucky districts are scrapping the time honored tradition.

Naming a high school valedictorian used to be simple: The school looked at student grades and chose the senior with the highest GPA in the graduating class. But nowadays, picking a valedictorian has become a whole lot more complicated, and, critics say, overly competitive. To address the problem, some school districts in Kentucky are even going so far as to completely scrap naming valedictorians.

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Could One Hour of Therapy Boost Black Student Achievement?

A new study suggests confidence building psychological exercises can help close the achievement gap


Could one hour—the amount of time it takes to watch American Idol—make black college freshman more likely to succeed in college and close the racial achievement gap? Two Stanford University professors say yes, as long those students spend that hour doing confidence building psychological exercises that make them feel like they actually belong on campus.

In a new paper published in the March 18 edition of Science, Gregory Walton, an assistant professor of psychology, and Geoffrey Cohen, a professor of psychology and education, say a sense of belonging is especially essential for black students who are underrepresented on campus and face a slew of negative stereotypes about their intelligence. Walton told the Stanford News that when a student comes from a minority background,

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