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Whoa. San Francisco just upped the ante in the nation's debates over gun legislation in the U.S.

In a unanimous resolution, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors has designated the National Rifle Association a domestic terrorist organization. It also urges other local and state governments, as well as the federal government, to do the same.

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Culture
via Geoffrey Fairchild / Flickr

A 2012 Mother Jones investigation found that gun violence costs every American more than $700 a year with a total cost of $229 billion per year — much of which is paid for by taxpayers.

Those costs include emergency services, police investigations, prison costs, lost wages, long-term mental and physical care, and impact on quality of life.

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Politics

Unique Pop-Up Shop Shows First-Time Gun Buyers Their Weapon’s Awful Past

Trigger-happy New Yorkers get a dose of history when trying to buy a gun.

image via youtube screen capture

In New York City, where buying and carrying a legal handgun is notoriously difficult, a pop-up storefront reaching out to “First Time Gun Owners” in big, bold letters across its windows was sure to attract plenty of attention. Appearing for several days last week on Manhattan’s Lower East Side, the simply named “Gun Shop” was, at first glance, just that: A store for purchasing firearms. Curious shoppers filed in, one after another, where they were met by a straightforward employee more than willing to direct customers to their perfect weapon. Some cited a need for protection. Others simply wanted to exercise their constitutional right to own a gun. As they all discovered, though, this shop wasn’t simply unique for where it was, but also for the weapons it carried.

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Articles

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At the Electronic Entertaining Expo (E3) in Los Angeles this week, the video game industry will be talking about Xbox One, the hottest new devices, and what will be the next Halo. But some folks are hoping to get the industry's attention on something else: guns.

A report released today by advocacy groups Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America and the Gun Truth Project, points out that video games are being used as a form of advertising for gun brands, and is calling to put an end to the practice.
The report, "Game Over: Resetting the Relationship Between Video Game and Gun Manufacturers," details how video games use realistic images of brand-name guns in order to make the game as realistic as possible, which sometimes means entering into licensing deals with the gun manufacturers. The gun makers make money off these deals, and manufacturers said gamers "are considered potential future owners."
"In some cases, money has been exchanged to secure product placement or legal rights," states the report. "In one scenario, video game product launches have been tied to online marketplaces for customers to purchase weapons used in the game."
The groups claim this commercial relationship promotes the gun industry and sparks young people's imagination in a dangerous way, which could lead to more gun violence in America.
Last month, one major video game publisher, Electronic Arts, announced it would end licensing deals, though it will still feature branded weapons. Now the advocacy groups are asking that other major video game publishers follow suit.
“We are outraged that video game companies and gun manufacturers are entering into deals to market guns to our children," said Shannon Watts, founder of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America in a statement. "Particularly given the real-life epidemic of gun violence in America.”
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Snoop Lion on Gun Control: End the Violence, Move Forward in Peace and Love

Growing up in the streets of Long Beach, I’ve seen lots of homies fall victim to gun violence.

Growing up in the streets of Long Beach, I’ve seen lots of homies fall victim to gun violence. Whether they were the ones behind the barrel or in front, in the end it never worked out. As I hear more and more stories in the news about violent acts of terror and school shootings that leave innocent kids dead, it makes me upset to live in a world full of negativity. Now more than ever, I feel the need to speak up and encourage our youth to come together to stop gun violence. That’s why I started my "No Guns Allowed" movement, inspired by my song of the same name that features my nephew Drake and my daughter, Cori B.

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