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15 of the World’s Greatest Job Perks

Toiling for the man is much more pleasant when your job offers thoughtful touches like employee pubs, surf breaks, and cat daycare.

Earlier this week, we learned about the “pre-cation,” a new recruiting perk used by successful startups to lasso the best and brightest in their industries. On signing the dotted line, draftees are immediately sent on a weeks-long paid vacation, the better to rest up and hit the ground running on that first day at the office.

As the era of human physical labor winds to a close, some of us (who haven’t already been replaced by algorithms or mechanical arms) can take comfort in the cushy work environments and delightful extras our handlers use to keep us inside the office, away from the frivolous distractions of the outside world. But if you think wearing your Crocs to casual Friday or receiving a birthday card signed by your work friends constitutes a pretty decent motivational perk, it’s time to think again—here are 15 of the best and most thoughtful job perks from companies around the world, so you know exactly what to drop in the “suggestions” box on your next trip to the office water cooler.

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Can We Fix Traffic By Paying Commuters to Play a Video Game?

Congestion pricing penalizes commuters. A new approach uses creative incentives to modify traffic patterns instead.

Stuck in traffic this morning on the way to your desk? If you were paid to leave an hour earlier (or later), would you? You've likely heard all about congestion pricing, a system that requires commuters to pay a charge to access the city center or other critical areas. But what if these plans rewarded the desired behavior rather than penalized the undesirable?

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Studies Support Rewards, Homework, and Traditional Teaching—Or Do They?

It's smart to be skeptical of education studies that seem to support traditional practices.


It’s not unusual to read that a new study has failed to replicate—or has even reversed—the findings of an earlier study. The effect can be disconcerting, particularly when medical research announces that what was supposed to be good for us turns out to be dangerous, or vice versa.

Qualifications and reversals also show up in investigations of education and human behavior, but here an interesting pattern seems to emerge. At first a study seems to validate traditional practices, but then subsequent studies—those that follow subjects for longer periods of time or use more sophisticated outcome measures—call that result into question.

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