GOOD

How a Simple Paper Funnel Is Making Indian Toilets Safer for Women

The “Pee Buddy” sounds a bit silly, but it just might be a major milestone in female hygiene across India.

image via youtube // pee buddy

“When you’ve gotta go,” says that old adage, “you’ve gotta go.” But for millions of women across India, “going” is not quite as easy a proposition as it is for that country’s men. When it comes to restrooms in the capital city of Delhi, for example, there is a reported 10 to 1 ratio in favor of men’s public toilets, making it excessively difficult for many women to answer nature when it calls. What’s more, many of the women’s toilets are dirty, poorly maintained, and decidedly unhygienic, which presents a particular problem for anyone unable to stand while peeing. Often, women are faced with the choice of using unsanitary facilities and assuming the health risks thereof, or simply holding it in until they find a clean lady’s room, an option that can take considerable time to pan out, and lead to bladder infections and UTIs.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Indian Fathers Fight Female Infanticide With Selfies

This campaign will make you cry—but for a cause.

Every year in India, thousands of baby girls are abandoned at birth. While some are rescued, most aren’t, leaving the nation with 7.1 million far fewer girls than boys. So earlier this year, Prime Minister Narendra Modi came up with a wholly inventive plan: have fathers across the nation take selfies with their daughters, then share them on the internet for the rest of the nation to see.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Millions of People Across the World Celebrate World Yoga Day

Over 35,000 people showed up for one single yoga class in India. Thousands followed worldwide.

Image via Flickr user Diamond Mountain

Yoga in America tends to take place in small intimate studios or large public parks, running the gamut from gorgeous to gross. But just yesterday, millions across the U.S. and the world over came together to celebrate the first ever International Yoga Day. In the city of New Delhi, India alone, over 35,000 people stretched out together, hoping to break the Guinness World Record for the largest number of people in a single yoga class.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Cleaning Up “The World’s Highest Junkyard”

Trash and human poop are making Everest a dump, but these new projects aim to de-muck the mountain.

Photo by shrimpo1967 via Wikimedia Commons

A lot has changed since Tenzing Norgay and Edmund Hillary first scaled the freezing peaks of Mount Everest in 1953. For one thing, attempting to summit Everest, though still perilous, has become a sort of rite of passage for X-treme yuppie adventurer types. More than 4,000 people have now climbed the mountain. As a result of this growing tourist popularity, Everest has also become covered in garbage and human poop (the most dangerous of all the poops). As GOOD’s Tasbeeh Herwees put it earlier this month, “For every moneyed thrill-seeker who thinks climbing Mount Everest is a novel post-college adventure, there is a mound of human waste sitting on top of the mountain to account for their privilege.” And fecal matter is just the tip of the shit pile; the Himalayan mountain is covered with the strewn trash of expeditions past, including, according to the Daily Mail India, “tents, sleeping bags, oxygen cylinders, and even the corpses of climbers who never made it down.” Now, two new cleanup efforts are underway—one an Indian army mountaineering team that aims to clean up litter, and the other a pioneering project to turn tourist dung into a source of energy.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

India is Home to a Two-Year-Old Katniss Everdeen

This archery prodigy is a toddler and she recently made it into the Indian Book of Records.

Screengrab from YouTube video of Dolly Shivani Cherukuri.

Talk about leaning the fuck in. Dolly Shivani Cherukuri, two years old, is probably not yet capable of reaching over the counter to grab a box of cookies but she’s already breaking national records. On Tuesday, the kindergarten archer became the youngest person in India to score more than 200 points at an archery event that took place in the city of Vijaywada. Representatives from the India Book of Records were on the scene to witness the tiny archery wunderkind kick ass and take names. They saw her score a total of 388, above and beyond the standard, which means she’ll probably get to keep her name in the record books for a very long time.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

The Most Isolated People on Earth Want to Stay That Way

Would-be visitors, intruders, and hapless shipwreck survivors are often murdered, and that’s probably why this tribe continues to thrive.

North Sentinel Island, part of India’s Andaman and Nicobar archipelagos in the Bay of Bengal, sits just 25 miles off the coast of South Andaman Island and 30 miles away from its developed, globally connected provincial capital of Port Blair. About 28 square miles of forest, the island is roughly one-fifth larger than Manhattan. All of the other islands in the chain have been explored and their respective native peoples have developed relations with the central government, but no outsider ever sets foot on North Sentinel Island. In fact, New Delhi has set up a three-mile exclusion zone around the island to protect its inhabitants, known as the Sentinelese, who through violent seclusion have remained possibly the most genuinely isolated peoples in the world, likely for thousands of years. And in their isolation, they provide a stark and illuminating contrast with other societies.

The Sentinelese are one of about 100 uncontacted tribes left in the world, most of which live clustered in remote West Papua and the Amazon rainforests of Brazil and Peru. But many of these other uncontacted tribes are not totally isolated, as cultural rights organization Survival International points out, over time, most peoples will learn something about their modern neighbors no matter what. However, many uncontacted tribes, either due to past atrocities visited upon them or a lack of interest in what they see of our modern world, choose to remain disengaged. They’re not “pristine” or primitive peoples, but rather shifting and dynamic cultures that preserve unique languages, systems of knowledge, and skills. And because they are not completely separated, they’re often subject to those who wish to contact them, either to attempt to evangelize and modernize them, or even eradicate them to clear land for development. As such, the Sentinelese are unique even among uncontacted tribes in their isolation from other cultures and external threats.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles