GOOD

How a Simple Paper Funnel Is Making Indian Toilets Safer for Women

The “Pee Buddy” sounds a bit silly, but it just might be a major milestone in female hygiene across India.

image via youtube // pee buddy

“When you’ve gotta go,” says that old adage, “you’ve gotta go.” But for millions of women across India, “going” is not quite as easy a proposition as it is for that country’s men. When it comes to restrooms in the capital city of Delhi, for example, there is a reported 10 to 1 ratio in favor of men’s public toilets, making it excessively difficult for many women to answer nature when it calls. What’s more, many of the women’s toilets are dirty, poorly maintained, and decidedly unhygienic, which presents a particular problem for anyone unable to stand while peeing. Often, women are faced with the choice of using unsanitary facilities and assuming the health risks thereof, or simply holding it in until they find a clean lady’s room, an option that can take considerable time to pan out, and lead to bladder infections and UTIs.

Keep Reading
Articles

Indian Fathers Fight Female Infanticide With Selfies

This campaign will make you cry—but for a cause.

Every year in India, thousands of baby girls are abandoned at birth. While some are rescued, most aren’t, leaving the nation with 7.1 million far fewer girls than boys. So earlier this year, Prime Minister Narendra Modi came up with a wholly inventive plan: have fathers across the nation take selfies with their daughters, then share them on the internet for the rest of the nation to see.

Keep Reading
Articles

Millions of People Across the World Celebrate World Yoga Day

Over 35,000 people showed up for one single yoga class in India. Thousands followed worldwide.

Image via Flickr user Diamond Mountain

Yoga in America tends to take place in small intimate studios or large public parks, running the gamut from gorgeous to gross. But just yesterday, millions across the U.S. and the world over came together to celebrate the first ever International Yoga Day. In the city of New Delhi, India alone, over 35,000 people stretched out together, hoping to break the Guinness World Record for the largest number of people in a single yoga class.

Keep Reading
Articles

Cleaning Up “The World’s Highest Junkyard”

Trash and human poop are making Everest a dump, but these new projects aim to de-muck the mountain.

Photo by shrimpo1967 via Wikimedia Commons

A lot has changed since Tenzing Norgay and Edmund Hillary first scaled the freezing peaks of Mount Everest in 1953. For one thing, attempting to summit Everest, though still perilous, has become a sort of rite of passage for X-treme yuppie adventurer types. More than 4,000 people have now climbed the mountain. As a result of this growing tourist popularity, Everest has also become covered in garbage and human poop (the most dangerous of all the poops). As GOOD’s Tasbeeh Herwees put it earlier this month, “For every moneyed thrill-seeker who thinks climbing Mount Everest is a novel post-college adventure, there is a mound of human waste sitting on top of the mountain to account for their privilege.” And fecal matter is just the tip of the shit pile; the Himalayan mountain is covered with the strewn trash of expeditions past, including, according to the Daily Mail India, “tents, sleeping bags, oxygen cylinders, and even the corpses of climbers who never made it down.” Now, two new cleanup efforts are underway—one an Indian army mountaineering team that aims to clean up litter, and the other a pioneering project to turn tourist dung into a source of energy.

Keep Reading
Articles