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Is Going to College in China the Wave of the Future?

International students enrolling in both undergraduate and graduate programs is becoming more common.


A semester studying in China to sharpen your Mandarin skills has become a smart move for college students with an eye on the international job market. Now growing numbers of students are heading to China for the long haul and enrolling in both undergraduate and graduate degree programs.

Peking University in particular has seen a veritable boom in international student enrollment. This year about 900 new international students enrolled in degree programs, with roughly 400 enrolling in undergraduate programs, 400 in master's degree programs and 75 pursuing doctoral studies. That may seem like a small amount, but that's up 17 percent from the previous year. An anonymous official at the school told China Daily the number of international students on campus has increased "about 20 percent each year since 2009." Overall about 290,000 international students studied in China in 2011 and 118,837 of them are enrolled in degree programs, up 10.6 percent since 2010.

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Why Growing Numbers of British Students Are Attending College in the U.S.

Thanks to skyrocketing tuition at domestic universities, an increasing number of British students are looking to the United States for college.


Thanks to skyrocketing tuition at domestic universities, an increasing number of British students are looking to the United States when it comes to choosing a college.

Anthony Seldon, head of Wellington College in Berkshire, England, told the BBC that about 40 percent of teenagers he talks to say they intend to go to school in the United States. Seldon’s anecdotal evidence echoes that of Lauren Welch, director of the Fulbright Commission, who says 4,000 interested students packed a recent recruitment fair for American universities the organization held in London. And according to the College Board, the number of British students taking the SAT has increased 30 percent.

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