GOOD

The Important Global Selfie Study We’ve All Been Waiting For is Here

SelfieCity analyzes selfies from five cities around the globe and theorizes the way we present ourselves to people online.

Here is a fatal blow to all your grandfather’s theories about the demise of civil society at the hands of this generation of self-involved millenials: people don’t actually take as many selfies as we think they do. SelfieCity is an ongoing research project that analyzes thousands of selfie photos from five cities around the world and organizes the resulting data points city by city, as well as by age groups and gender. Using the data, SelfieCity researchers attempt to theorize cultural and social meanings from their findings. After randomly selecting 120,000 photos from Instagram, they found that only about 3-5 percent of them were selfies. The rest of the photos depicted images from users’ everyday lives: animals, food, clothes, artwork, etc.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

How Blogging Helps Students Crush the Digital Divide

Forget pen and paper: This is a fresh way to get students from low income backgrounds excited about writing.


While teachers are certainly finding success engaging students through Twitter, in the real world those kids have to know how to write more than 140 characters. We've written before about how blogging is a fun and fresh way to encourage reluctant students to write. And, as Oceanside, California, teacher John Schwartz discovered, it even works with students from low-income backgrounds with varying degrees of English proficiency.

This past school year Schwartz taught a 36-student, fourth/fifth-grade combination class at Garrison Elementary School. Over 60 percent of his students "came from households where English was the second language, or wasn’t spoken at all," and most of their working parents "were able to provide limited academic support."

Keep Reading Show less
Articles