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Should They Release the Tucson Shooting Video?

Video footage of the recent massacre in Tucson, Arizona, has surfaced. It will definitely be used in court, but should the public see it too?

Almost two weeks out from the Tucson, Arizona, massacre that left six people dead, one congresswoman on the brink of death, and several others hospitalized, most Americans still can’t picture the horror that took place in that Safeway parking lot. Try as we might to fathom the carnage, we’re left to piece together the incident based on various eyewitness testimonies and, perhaps, our nightmares. But now comes news that alleged gunman Jared Loughner’s rampage was caught on tape, and with a clarity that allows you to see heroic rescues and horrific deaths.

Without a doubt, prosecutors will make this security camera footage their star piece of evidence in the case against Loughner. But in an age of increasing transparency, when everyone wants as much information as possible, does the Tucson shooting video also belong on YouTube?

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Why Jared Loughner's Mugshot Probably Isn't Creepy

As evil as it looks, science says Jared Loughner's creepy grin could very well be the mark of a scared kid.


Over at Slate, Jack Shafer has called Jared Lee Loughner's clean-shaven, grinning mugshot "the living avatar of evil." Considering that the photo was taken just hours after Loughner allegedly killed six people, one of them a little girl, his smile is a bit discomforting. But menacing and "evil"? Science says not necessarily.

Despite what those "Don't Worry, Be Happy" T-shirts may tell you, the smile is actually a very complex expression. It's used to convey cheer, of course, but remember that smiling can also be used as a defense mechanism in times of distress.

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Actually, Many Muslim Terrorists Are as Unbalanced as Jared Loughner

Despite what the media says, the difference between Jared Loughner's mind and that of many Muslim terrorists isn't so drastic.


As I pointed out on the Monday after the deadly rampage at Gabrielle Giffords's meeting with constituents in Tucson, Arizona, several major media outlets seem reluctant to call the accused gunman Jared Loughner a terrorist, preferring instead to describe him as "unhinged" or "detached." When Andrew Stack flew his plane into an I.R.S. building in Austin, Texas, in February 2010, the media portrayed a similar rush to not pass judgment. The New York Times, in fact, said Stack was initially thought to be a terrorist, but then: "[I]n place of the typical portrait of a terrorist driven by ideology, Mr. Stack was described as generally easygoing, a talented amateur musician with marital troubles and a maddening grudge against the tax authorities." (Because terrorists don't have hobbies or domestic disputes, apparently.)

Comparatively, pretty much every rampage committed by a Muslim is immediately considered terrorism, with other motives being secondary and tertiary concerns.

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Arizonans Rush to Buy Glocks After Shooting

Arizonans are flocking to the gun store following Saturday's deadly shooting.

Though stories of selfless heroism provided a silver lining in the immediate wake of the attack on Gabrielle Giffords and others in Tucson, Arizona, on Saturday, it has also been followed by a rush to stock up on guns.

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Places Jared Loughner Wouldn't Have Been Able to Own His Gun, and Why

In many countries and states, Jared Loughner wouldn't have been able to legally own the gun he used to allegedly kill six people. Here's why.


On November 30, 2010, in Tucson, Arizona, suspected gunman Jared Loughner was able to buy a Glock 19 semiautomatic handgun, which he then outfitted with a special extended magazine that afforded him 18 more bullets than a standard magazine would have. In light of Saturday’s massacre, we thought we would remind you of the places Loughner wouldn’t have been able to legally buy a gun, and why.

Brazil: You have to be 25 years old to buy a gun in Brazil, and it’s illegal for civilians to carry guns outside their homes.

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