GOOD

Things are easier said than done, or so the old adage goes, and we couldn't agree more. That's why we do The GOOD 30-Day Challenge (#30DaysofGOOD), a monthly attempt to live better. Our challenge for July? Waste less.

Yesterday on Twitter and Facebook, we asked our friends: What would you do with all the land that is now taken up by landfills?

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Duke and UNC Adopt Caps and Gowns Made Out of Recycled Plastic Bottles

Good news: A new fabric called GreenWeaver, spun from molten plastic pellets, is being used for the graduation gear by a growing list of schools.


Need another good reason to recycle your plastic bottles? They might end up as part of someone's graduation cap and gown outfit. The Virginia-based company Oak Hall Cap & Gown has long produced graduation gear, but in 2008, after realizing that schools are trying to become more environmentally responsible, it began developing a fabric called GreenWeaver that's spun from molten plastic pellets. Each gown uses an average of 23 post-consumer plastic bottles—even the bags the gowns come in are made out of recycled plastic.

According to GreenWeaver's Facebook page, five percent of colleges currently purchase the environmentally conscious caps and gowns. That translates into "310,000 graduates who have worn GreenWeaver resulting in 7,130,000 plastic bottles being removed from landfills."

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Chart: Recycling Is Way, Way Up in California

Last year 82 percent of bottles and cans sold in California were recycled. That's the highest level since 1992. Recycle Rex would be proud.


Anyone remember Recycle Rex?

Anyway, recycling rates are way up in California. Here's the chart:

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