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Black Students Are Three Times More Likely to Be Suspended Than Their White Classmates

New data from the Office of Civil Rights provides hard evidence of prejudice against black and Latino students in America's education system.


As my third-grade son walked down a school hallway last week, a teacher stopped him and accused him of stealing something. He told her he didn't know anything about the incident, but she pressured him to confess. She even asked her students—who were also in the hallway and heard the whole exchange—if they thought he was the thief.

It's tempting to write off the incident as one educator's lapse of judgment, but, in fact, my son's experience is a symptom of a larger pattern of discrimination in our nation's schools. Data released this week by the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights provides hard evidence of prejudice against black and Latino students in America's education system.

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A City Education: Why Adults Must Model Racial Unity for Students

"Mister, why do you hang out with him?" a Latino seventh-grader student asked my teammate Ricky at lunch.


In our A City Education series, two City Year corps members share their experiences working as tutors and mentors in schools in hopes of closing the achievement gap and ending the dropout crisis.

"Mister, why do you hang out with him?" a Latino seventh-grader student asked my teammate Ricky at lunch.

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California's New Bilingual College Speaks the Language of America's Future

Only 13 percent of Latinos have a bachelor's degree. Bilingual college programs may the answer.


One in five students in America is Latino, but when it comes to graduating from college, only 13 percent are earning a bachelor's degree. Now a $100 million investment fund, "University Ventures," which is backed by German media giant Bertlesmann and two Texas university systems, plans to address the higher education needs of English language learners by starting a bilingual college in California.

The fund is starting the still-to-be-named school through a partnership with Brandman University, an 11,000 student, 25-campus, non-profit college. Brandman's chancellor, Gary Brahm told the Chronicle of Higher Education that the school will adapt its curricula to meet the needs of Latino students who want to go on to college but might not feel like they know enough English to succeed on campus.

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A More Diverse Class of 2015: Harvard Accepts Record Numbers of Black and Latino Students

Of course, the overall admission rate was lower than ever: 6.2 percent.


It's a record breaking admissions season at Harvard University. The Ivy League school received the largest number of applications for admission this year—almost 35,000 students. Then the school admitted a record low 6.2 percent of applicants. But—and this is the really good news—despite the stiff competition, the number of black and Latino students accepted into the class of 2015 might just be the highest in school history.

The class of 2015 is 11.8 percent black and 12.1 percent Latino. That's up slightly from 11.3 percent black and 10.6 percent Latino for the previous year. What made the difference? The school prides itself on its Undergraduate Minority Recruitment Program, an effort staffed by current minority students at the school. They help coordinate recruitment efforts and reach out to prospective minority applicants to answer questions and address concerns about attending the university. It's a smart idea because current students best know what it feels like to wonder if you're going to fit into the academic and social life at a school.

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Do We Need College Scholarships for White Men?

A new Texas nonprofit says being male and white doesn't help you pay for college, so they're starting a scholarship program just for white men.


A Texas nonprofit's plan to offer five $500 scholarships to white men is putting conventional wisdom about white male privilege and the ability to pay for higher education in the spotlight. According to the Former Majority Association for Equality—named because white people are no longer the racial majority in Texas—being a white male isn't an asset when it comes to access to college scholarships because they don't "fit into certain categories or ethnic groups."

FMAE president Colby Bohannan served in the military in Iraq, but says that when he returned to Texas and hunted around for ways to pay for school, he felt left out because he isn't female or a member of a minority group. A low-income white male doesn't have, as Bohannan told CNN, "a bunch of money sitting around" to pay for college.

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