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Debranded: Selfridges Launches 'No Noise' Campaign

Selfridges new No Noise campaign includes a collection of products stripped of their logos.

Selfridges, a U.K. department store, thinks that the experience of shopping is due for a change. "As we become increasingly bombarded with information and stimulation, the world is becoming a noisier place," the store writes on their site. In response, they launched a 'quiet shopping' campaign called No Noise this week.

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Toto, We're Not in Jersey Anymore: The Nets' Design Goes Hipster

What might seem a "basic" or "boring" approach to branding is much deeper than meets the eye.


As the Nets prepare the move from suburban New Jersey to a brand-new arena among the brownstones of Brooklyn, the team's redesigned logo has attracted both fans and foes. The stripped-down, black-and-white icon surprised many fans for its departure from trends in sports logo design. Unlike the overly rendered, multi-dimensional logos of other NBA teams—the Knicks and the Grizzlies, to name two—the Nets are positing themselves as minimalists. With a simple shield bearing the team's name and a basketball branded with the letter 'B,' the logo looks more akin to a 1930s woodcut print than a modern-day NBA graphic.

What might seem a "basic" or "boring" approach to branding—two adjectives common on basketball forums over the past 24 hours—is much deeper than meets the eye. The press release from the Nets frames the new imagery as a homage to New York City: “[The brand identity] incorporates a timeless black and white color palette of the old New York subway signage system, including its clean ‘RollSign’ typeface,” the team writes. Though hip-hop mogul Jay-Z is credited with designing the logo and color scheme, it is likely that designer Timothy Morris, who has provided graphic work for Jay-Z on other projects, had a major hand in the final logo.

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From Start-Up to Household Name, the Boba Guys' Science of Logos

From the Nike swoosh to the Chiquita banana lady, a tour of what matters in a company's logo.



Many designers cite the Nike swoosh as their favorite logotype of all time, and rightfully so. It has not changed much since its inception. The swoosh embodies the spirit of the eponymous goddess of victory who inspired the most courageous warriors at the dawn of civilization. You immediately understand what Nike stands for when you see the company’s logo. That’s hard to do.

It’s not my favorite logo, though. My heart lies with the Chiquita banana lady. Brand recognition is undeniable with the Chiquita banana—their logo of a lady wearing a fruit headdress on each and every one of the bananas they sell. I can’t think of another fruit company that markets and places such a strong emphasis on packaging. What was once a commodity has now become a household name.

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