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Here's One Way to Keep People Honest When Filling Out Forms

Where you sign your name on a form might change how you fill it out.

Brandon Keim wrote for Wired that scientists believe putting signature boxes at the top of forms—as opposed to at the bottom—encourages honesty when answers questions like mileage claims.

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Want to Feel Healthier and Happier? Cut Back on Lying

New research from the University of Notre Dame suggests that lying less can make you less tense and reduce your headaches.

The costs of lying extend beyond burning pants. According to new research led by Anita Kelly, a psychologist at the University of Notre Dame who studies secrecy, self-disclosure, and self-presentation, telling lies—both little "white lies" and major deceptions—takes a psychological and physiological toll.

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Drilling Deeper Into BP's Sustainability Review

The graph that BP's Sustainability Review leaves out, and what else is missing from the oil company's report.

This morning Cord posted a startling chart about BP's oil spill accounting in their latest Sustainability Review. The chart shows BP's "volume of oil spilled" in 2006, 2008, and 2010, and was pretty infuriating as it didn't include numbers from the Gulf oil spill. Which, obviously, changes things.

Here are the numbers that the graph was culled from:

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Video: Historian Admits to Falsifying Lincoln's Final Act

With a Spielberg-helmed Abraham Lincoln biopic in the works, at least one Lincoln lie can be put to rest before it's forever pressed into celluloid.


With a Spielberg-helmed Abraham Lincoln biopic in the works, at least one Lincoln lie can be put to rest before it's forever pressed into celluloid.

The National Archives announced today that Thomas Lowry, an Archives historian, has admitted to literally rewriting history by altering a Lincoln presidential pardon that is part of the Archives' permanent collection. Lowry changed the date of the pardon for Patrick Murphy, a Union Civil War solider who was court-martialed for desertion, to read April 14, 1865 instead of April 14, 1864. Lincoln was assassinated at Ford's Theater on April 14, 1865, meaning that, had the pardon happened that day, it would probably have been his last official act as president, and thus a significant piece of history.

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