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Summer Maker Camp Brings DIY Creativity to Life For Teens

At Maker Camp, tents and mosquitoes are totally optional.


Looking for a camp where tents and mosquito bites are optional? Thanks to Google and MAKE magazine's Maker Camp, a just-launched virtual summer camp that's rooted in "DIY, making, creating, crafting, hacking, tinkering, and discovery," teens can learn how to make everything from an easy balloon blimp to a rocket-propelled toy car—and it's all free.

The way Maker Camp works is each day at 2 PM EDT for the next six weeks the folks running it will post a different project or activity as a Google+ hangout. The hangouts feature an "accomplished maker" who walks students through the day's project. Or, if there's a maker space in their community, students can head there to interact with both makers and other student participants.

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The Future of Stuff: The Global Breaker Challenge

How do you redesign manufacturing in 14 days? Students in teams around the world are trying to figure this out now in the Breaker Challenge...

How do you redesign manufacturing in 14 days? Students in teams around the world are trying to figure this out now in the Breaker Challenge 2013—focused on the way consumers can become producers. Project Breaker lead Juliette LaMontagne explains:

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San Francisco School Takes Experiential Learning to the Next Level

At Brightworks, kids learn by completing projects. With electric drills.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6VPezJ3AMXk

Imagine receiving an electric drill to use at school—and the freedom to learn and explore while building things with it. That’s what happens at Brightworks, a year-old nonprofit private alternative school located in San Francisco’s Mission District.

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Why Schools Should Embrace the Maker Movement

What better way to get students interested in math, science, and design than helping them build a robot or go-kart?

One of the big challenges educators have is figuring out how to bring what they're teaching to life. It's a lot easier to get students to grasp why they need to learn abstract math, science, or design concepts when teachers bring project-based learning—like building a robot or a go-kart—into the classroom. So it makes perfect sense for teachers to team up with the Maker movement—the community of do-it-yourselfers who tap "science, art, performance, creative reuse, and technology" to make something fresh and useful.

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