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Go Inside the Haunted Museum Getting Jaded New Yorkers Excited About Holographic Art

The Hologram Center’s “Holohouse” lets visitors play with, and learn about, a uniquely modern form of artistic expression.

Castle William on Governor's Island, image via Wikicommons

New York City is huge. 8.4 million people huge to be exact, and, especially in the summer, it can feel like they are all squished directly next you on the subway. If you’re new to the city you might be unaware that just a quick boat ride from Brooklyn Bridge Park there’s a literal island of calm amongst the madness. First “discovered” in the 1600s by Dutch settlers, Governors Island was an important strategic base during the Civil War, and, later in the 20th century, home to the U.S. Coast Guard. In the 90s much of the area was turned into a national park (and occasional summer concert venue), and today those who want a taste of culture sans the lines come to the island to relax, take in the public art, and even catch a few ghosts. Yes! It’s been rumored that parts of the island are haunted—especially the historic Nolan Park area. It’s here that one of the world’s only holographic museums has set up shop for the summer, bringing ephemeral art to match the translucent specters its host destination is known for. Now in its second year, visitors to the Holocenter House will be able to see, touch, and even walk through a wide array of holograms created by some of the pioneers of the art form. A true passion project by its creators, the museum has already succeeded in both turning an otherwise overlooked NYC landmark into a fun (and spooky) summer destination, and promoting while preserving an art form many have overlooked.

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Now Open: Italy’s Poop-Centric “Museo della Merda” is Full of Crap

Located just south of Milan, the “Museum of Sh*t” offers a uniquely fecal experience

image via (cc) flickr user mulsanne

Sometimes a trip to the museum can be a wonderful experience, full of great art or fascinating science. Other times, though, it can be pretty shitty.

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The Week in Design

A special Monday edition of everything good in art and design.

A whole new museum

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What Parents Everywhere Can Learn From This Trailblazing Toy Maker

Zandraa Tumen-Ulzii spreads the gospel of the puzzle.

On a side street in the less-than-touristy eastern section of downtown Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, tucked behind a tent-shaped building half-gutted by fire, you might just manage to find a four-story pink building. Notched with knobby, knot-shaped decorations, it’s distinctive for the neighborhood, but invisible from the nearby main thoroughfare, Peace Avenue. Yet inside this hidden low-rise is one of the world’s most whimsical, engaging, and underappreciated cultural galleries, the misleadingly named International Intellectual Museum.

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How We're Turning the City into a Public Laboratory

Anyone who lives in a city can feel, at least at times, like they’re part of a grand experiment. As we move through public space, the volume of...

Anyone who lives in a city can feel, at least at times, like they’re part of a grand experiment. As we move through public space, the volume of people, traffic, noise and visual stimuli is energizing, and overwhelming. Faced with an abundance of visual data, we make split-second observations and decisions that shape how we see the world around us. But how well are we really seeing the world, and the people in it?

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Fun and Fine Art: Why a Slide in a Museum Isn't Simple Frivolity

Are museum exhibitions with "tricks" just "arty junk food?"

If your local museum had a roller coaster would it make visiting more fun? How about a slide? For the general public the answer would likely be yes, but for art world purists, the idea of having "fun" in a museum is met with suspicion, or at least concern that tricks to get attendance numbers up will trivialize the institution and its purpose, and take the focus off the main attraction—art. But around the globe, when institutional funding is at an all time low, exhibitions that bring in an audience outside of the insular art community, may make sense: higher attendance numbers means more money earned.

So it seems those favoring playful experiences have been pitted against those with an allegiance to more earnest, intellectual exhibitions. In London, architects firm Atelier Zundel Cristea recently won the proposal to transform one of the world's more recognized buildings—London's Battersea Power Station—into a museum of architecture with a fully functional, gravity defying roller coaster surrounding it. The firm is fully aware this might ruffle some feathers and explains, "In its spatial ambition, our project encourages play and fun, categories largely devalued in the traditional world of art. Conceived in this way, cultural spaces are liable to attract new types of visitors."

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