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This Cheesy, Star-Studded ‘90s Recycling PSA is Amazing

If Bette Midler, Queen Latifah, and Bugs Bunny can’t get you to recycle, then no one can.

Ozzy Osbourne and a Cartoon Yak. Screenshot from "Yakety Yak-Take it Back" video

Recycling has come a long way since the early ‘90s. But let me take you back to the nascent days of curbside sorting, when no one knew the difference between different kinds of plastics, Everybody was Dancing Now, and a sincere young Michael Stipe was Losing his Religion. Jolie Jones, daughter of Quincy, and founder of the Take it Back Foundation, an environmental awareness group, had an idea for bringing the magic of other star-studded musical benefits like “We Are the World” to the issue of recycling. The result was “Yakety Yak—Take it Back,” a recycling-themed send up of the Coasters’ 1958 megahit “Yakety Yak (Don’t Talk Back),” featuring some of the biggest musical stars of the day, along with a number of animated characters.

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China’s Internet Administration Has Its Own Anthem. Why Not American Agencies?

Some ideas for American federal agency anthems in light of China’s new operatic ode to its internet regulatory administration

image via youtube screen capture

China’s online censorship and cyber-security protocols – known commonly as the “Great Firewall” – are known for being among the strictest, and most far-reaching, in the whole of cyberspace. The degree to which China controls what its citizens do and don’t see online is equal parts technologically impressive and alarmingly worrisome for anyone who believes in the free flow of ideas and communication. The Chinese government, of course, is very proud of their internet censorship program – so much so that they’ve created a operatic theme to celebrate their accomplishments. Yes, a soaring anthem for internet censorship:

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Chilean Rapper Ana Tijoux Takes on Capitalism in New Video

Hip-hop has always been a useful vehicle for revolutionary political ideals, and the acclaimed emcee has always deployed it for that purpose

Photo courtesy of Nacional Records

It’s hard to get ahold of Ana Tijoux these days. When she isn’t playing shows in New York and Los Angeles, creating music with Palestinian rapper Shadia Mansour, or penning fiery feminist essays for the Walker Art Center, the 37-year old Chilean MC is back home, spending time with her son and daughter, Luciano and Emilia. When Tijoux released her latest album Vengo earlier this year, her impassioned delivery and highly political lyrics garnered glowing reviews from music critics all over the world. “The music of Vengo is virtually flawless,” declared NPR.

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Kanye Is Wrong: His Murdered Woman Video Is Totally Misogynistic

Kanye West's new video, in which the props are murdered women, is misogynistic, regardless of what the rapper says.

If you've watched Kanye West's new video for "Monster," a raw cut of which leaked back in December, you might find it a bit misogynistic, what with all the dead women everywhere. Some of the ladies are lynched, while others, their eyes glazed over like a rotting fish's, sit lifeless in West's bed while he manipulates their limp arms. It's a bit rapey and a lot creepy, and it makes sense to think that West, or at least the video's director, Jake Nava, have some serious issues with women. But then there's the disclaimer.

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School Bans Gold Grills. Students Respond with Hip-Hop Track

Teens at Savannah High School decided to make a rap song about the annoying no gold teeth rule. Their principal gave them permission to make a video.

\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n Savannah High School principal Toney Jordan says he doesn't "allow my kids to talk to me with those removable gold teeth grills in their mouths, and we have a strict policy for tucking in shirttails." The Georgia principal is always reminding kids of the rules, so in response to his badgering, senior Raynell Murrel and his friends composed a rap song titled, "I Can't Hear You With That Gold in Your Mouth." Instead of giving them detention, the good-natured administrator encouraged their creative spark by helping them make a mini music video.

Jordan asked technology teacher Deborah Hargroves to assist the teens with the effort. She told the Savannah Morning News, "It has become a school-wide project. Everyone is going to have a part—the band, the cheerleaders, even the staff will do little dance routines." When it's finished, the teens plan to enter it in student media contests and, of course, have a video release party.

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