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Nature Inspires Net To Fight Back Against Oil Spills

The net could cost just $1 per square foot, according to researchers at Ohio State University

Clean Up Crews Hard At Work via Flickr User John Kim

Previous oil spills have brought to light that our limited responses to such catastrophes are exceedingly expensive and often fall short of the intended goals. The longer an oil spill persists, the wider it spreads, and the deadlier it is to local communities, wildlife, and habitats.

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Fuck Yeah Humanity (FYH), a GOOD original series, curates the finest in innovation, achievement, news, and nature.

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Are These Self-Propelled Micro-Machines The Future Of Medicine?

Tiny “micromotors” just made their first trip through a living body, and that might only be the beginning.

nanomachine image from shutterstock

From 1966’s The Fantastic Voyage to Marvel’s upcoming Ant Man, we’ve spent decades entertaining ourselves with fantastical stories about science’s ability to make big things small, and small things extraordinary. Now, in a case of life imitating art, we may be poised on the cusp of a nano-revolution that breaks free from science fiction, and into the realm of science fact.

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Can a Denim Kilt Fight Climate Change?

A chemist and a fashion scholar team up to fight air pollution through apparel.

Clothing made from organic cotton or other eco-friendly materials may lessen an outfit's environmental impact. But what about garments that benefit the air by sucking up pollutants? A futuristic collaboration between a nanotechnologist and fashion designer is raising the bar for environmentally friendly fashion with concept line Catalytic Clothing.

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Tastes Like Nanotechnology

A small step towards federal oversight for the safety of some very small particles that are making their way into foods.


Nanofilters can remove viruses from milk and nanomaterials could soon block cholesterol in canola oil from entering our bloodstream. They can alter the texture of ice cream. Tiny particles in chicken feed can latch onto Campylobacter jejuni and keep the bacteria from getting into our chicken nuggets. Tiny silica spheres could be used to detect the presence of the harmful E. coli 0157 bacteria in organic sprouts.

These nano-innovations have been heralded as a defining feature of the future of our food, but until yesterday, there had been little federal oversight, despite the toxicological risks associated with shrinking materials and adding them to the environment. Moreover, the information remains in the hands of food and agriculture companies.

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