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The World Celebrates As Nevada Passes “Burning Man Tax”

The magical festival that magically escaped state tax must now pay.

Image via Flickr user Duncan Rawlinson

Every year, over 60,000 people come to Burning Man for reasons that scientists have yet to understand. Tickets to this communal festival of radical self-expression hover around $390, and place a big drain on state resources. So Nevada decided to take action and impose a 9% tax on all of the state’s large-ticket events, including Burning Man and The Electric Daisy Carnival. Festival organizers are not pleased.

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Burning Man: More Relevant Than Ever

It requires reorientation from the Polaris of wealth, competition, and individualism. That can be unsettling, like a hint of negative G.


Six hours ago, the sun was up and I was sober. It was dark now, and I was not sober. A middle-aged man with a waxed moustache, monocle, and bowler hat was standing in front of me, looking me in the eye. “You have an excellent hug,” he said, adding, “shall we do a shot?”

I was in a bar that was built that Monday and would vanish by Sunday. Both myself and the man in the top hat were covered in a fine patina of dust, a gift from an afternoon wind and millions of years of mountains melting into four hundred square miles of impossibly flat dry lakebed—the Playa, a fractured alkali hard-pack, the desiccated void from which a strange mirage rises for one week a year. This was Burning Man.

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No, a 9-Year-Old Didn't Come Up with a Great New Water Conservation Plan

The feel-good environmental story of the day is actually a tale of woeful municipal stupidity in Reno, Nevada.

The viral climate story today is that a 9-year-old boy, Mason Perez, came up with an ingenious way to save water in his hometown of Reno, Nevada. After noticing that the sinks at a local baseball stadium spewed water fast enough to hurt his hands, Perez theorized that his desert community could conserve valuable resources by reducing unnecessary pressure in sinks and showers.

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America's Next Top Solar Power Plant

America's newest "largest solar photovoltaic plant," the Copper Mountain Solar Facility in Nevada, opened a few weeks ago.


America's newest "largest solar photovoltaic plant," the Copper Mountain Solar Facility, opened a few weeks ago. It's in the Nevada desert (40 miles southeast of Las Vegas), covers 380 acres, and produces 48 megawatts at full capacity. That's enough to power something like 20,000 homes. The power has been sold to Pacific Gas & Electric, so it'll be keeping the lights on for people in the Southern half of California. We're getting there, folks.

The largest solar photovoltaic power plant in the world, by the way, is the Sarnia plant in Ontario, Canada.

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Harry Reid Keeps His DREAM Act Campaign Promises

Harry Reid promises to bring the DREAM Act to a vote in the lame duck Congress.


You might have thought Republican control of Congress would kill the DREAM Act's chances of becoming reality, but Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid announced otherwise today via his Twitter account. "I will move the DREAM Act as a standalone bill in the lame duck. It's good for the economy & Pentagon says good for natl security," he wrote.

The DREAM—Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors—Act gives a path to citizenship to young people here illegally if they've been in the country for at least five years, have a good character, and complete two years of military service or college.

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