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Too Big to Fail

Mayoral control of schools in the nation's biggest districts.

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Does New York City Give Preferential Treatment to White Schools Chancellor Candidates?

Since 2000, chancellors lacking the credentials to run New York City's schools have been granted waivers. Critics say that's because they're white.

Did former Hearst Magazines Chairman Cathie Black get a waiver to become chancellor of New York City’s public schools because she's white? According to Roger Wareham, a human rights attorney and member of the Brooklyn-based Freedom Party, the answer is, "Yes."

Wareham has filed a petition against a host of players-including Mayor Bloomberg and State Education Commissioner David Steiner, who was involved in both Black's appointment and the granting of the waiver. The waiver enables Black to become chancellor despite lacking a master's degree required by the state.

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Should a Teacher's Value-added Score Be Made Public?

New York City's teachers' union wants to keep teacher performance data from being released. What's to hide?

Should the names of teachers and the test scores of their students be made public? Not according to the United Federation of Teachers, which represents New York City's public school teachers. Earlier today, the union's lawyers presented oral arguments to the New York Supreme Court in Manhattan to keep the New York City Department of Education from giving media outlets the names of teachers and their student's test results

These "Teacher Data Reports" for the city's fourth through eighth grade math and English teachers include what the union calls, "fundamentally flawed" value-added data, "based on the students' standardized test scores, which themselves were found to be inflated and inaccurate."

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