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The Feminist Life: Malala Won’t Use the F-Word

A new column exploring women’s rights, promoting gender equality, and confronting sexism

On October 9, 2012, I had just returned to my New York City apartment in between classes at Columbia Business School when I saw the headlines: “Taliban Gun Down Girl Who Spoke Up for Rights.” Enraged and hopeless, I felt that the world had imploded and the promise of a better future—of equality between men and women everywhere—was dimmer than ever.

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9 Ways Kids Keep Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Dream Alive

Fifty years after King received the Nobel Peace Prize, youth continue to spread the civil rights leader’s message.

Fifty years ago, on October 14, 1964, Martin Luther King, Jr., received the Nobel Peace Prize. The award came a year after the civil rights leader’s “I Have a Dream” speech in Washington, D.C., and months after the Civil Rights Act was signed into law. King learned about the recognition while at an Atlanta hospital for a checkup and accepted the award weeks later in Oslo, Norway. His 12-minute acceptance speech touched on themes of nonviolence, freedom, and peace.

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Congratulations to the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize Winners

Child rights advocates Malala Yousafzai and Kailash Satyarthi are recognized for their work in education and child labor reform.

On Friday, the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to Malala Yousafzai, a young woman from Pakistan who has risked her life to speak up for equal education opportunities for girls. At 17, Yousafzai is the youngest recipient of the prize ever, and the first from Pakistan. Kailash Satyarthi, of India, has dedicated his life to combating child exploitation, for which he also won this year’s prize. His peaceful protests have drawn attention to child slavery as well as harsh child labor conditions. According to the BBC, the pair of winners already plan to work together to promote the right of education for every child, and to strengthen cultural relations between their two countries, long political foes.

We congratulate these inspirational individuals by sharing some of their wisdom and beliefs.

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It's Nobel Time: Peace

It's the first time the Peace Prize gone to a Chinese person, but the Chinese government is not pleased.

And the winner is Liu Xiaobo, the jailed Chinese dissident. Just like the oddsmakers said. Liu is a human rights activist in China currently serving an 11-year jail term. It's the third time the Peace Prize has gone to someone in jail, and the first time it has gone to a Chinese person. Before prison, Liu was a tireless proponent of China giving more human rights to his citizens. His arrest was a result of his creation of an online petition, demanding the Chinese government grant its citizens basic human rights. Instead of doing so, it arrested him.

China, acting like it was desperately trying to confirm why its jailed human rights activists should receive the Peace Prize, denounced the decision:

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