GOOD

At this past weekend's Techonomy Conference 2010 in Lake Tahoe, One Laptop per Child Founder Nicholas Negroponte answered a fundamental question that OLPC critics have fired his way over the years: You can't just hand a kid in a developing world country a laptop and continue on your way, can you?

According to the program's experience in Peru, Negroponte says, "you actually can" do just that. The kids apparently cotton to the new technology pretty easily, and can even use it to teach themselves how to read and write. But, that's not all, he explains: "50 percent of the kids in Peru who use this laptop are teaching their parents how to read and write."

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Late last week, Nicholas Negroponte, founder and chairman of One Laptop per Child (OLPC), invited the Indian Ministry of Human Resource Development (MHRD), which unveiled a $35 tablet PC last month, to travel to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to study the know-how the OLPC team had developed for its XO laptop. In an open letter, printed in The Times of India and on the OLPC site, he labeled the Indian effort as a possible collaborator, rather than a competitor.

Negroponte also offers six pieces of advice for how the Indian government should proceed in developing its device. Here are the first two:

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

India may have just introduced a new threat to both the One Laptop Per Child's $100 XO Laptop and Apple's iPad: a $35 touchscreen tablet PC capable of connecting to the Internet, video conferencing, and even drawing solar power. For a country where 600 million of its 1 billion people already own cellphones, this handheld device appears to be the next logical upgrade in connectivity for the world's largest democracy.

According to India's Human Resources Development Minister, Kapil Sibal, who unveiled the tablet today, the primary target for its initial launch is the education sector. Government officials told CNN that it wanted the country's universities fully connected, as part of its education goals, and that this device—the price of which could soon fall as low as $10—could be the key to hitting that target.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles