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Making Fish Farming Appetizing

Aqua-Spark wants to change an industry known for unclean practices

There’s a certain appeal to fish farming, also known as aquaculture. Growing aquatic life in offshore pens, rivers, or big, terrestrial tanks seems not only audacious, but as convenient as, well, shooting fish in a barrel. Already, aquaculture accounts for nearly 50 percent of the worldwide fish supply, and it’s growing faster than any other type of food production. Farm-raised seafood will soon jump to 62 percent of global fish served on a plate or bought in a supermarket by 2030, a 500 percent growth rate over 20 years, according to the USDA. At a time when 85 percent of marine life is overexploited and overfished, aquaculture seems like a viable alternative.

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Intermission: Ocean 2012's Beautiful Overfishing Explainer

This 4-minute video explainer on the problems facing the world's fisheries benefits from a gorgeous, pixelated animation style.

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Can Chesapeake Oysters Evolve Their Way Out of Trouble?

The Chesapeake Bay's oyster colonies are in bad shape. But a new, disease-resistant population has emerged. Natural selection to the rescue! We hope.

When colonialists first settled in the Chesapeake Bay, oyster reefs made of old shells piled so high that they threatened to sink ships sailing into the harbor. In the late 1800s, the bay’s oyster population could filter enough water in three or four days to fill the entire Chesapeake Bay; now there are so few oysters in the bay that it would take a year for them to perform the same task. The population currently stands at one percent of historic levels.

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