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19 Rude And Selfish Parkers Who Pissed Off The Wrong Parking Lots

Don’t do this at home. But if you do, please take a picture.

Vandalizing someone’s car is wrong and illegal, so don’t do it. But what you can do is check out what happened to these incredibly rude parkers who pissed off the wrong people. Check out this slideshow of photos collected on Reddit by Distractify, featuring bad parkers “Who Got A Swift Visit From Karma.”

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Los Angeles Rolls Out New Idiot-Proof Parking Signs

L.A.’s drivers need all the help they can get.

Parking tickets suck, especially when you feel like you just fell victim to some sort of elaborate psychological trap intent on making you cough up your cash. Don’t abuse yourself trying to make sense of the next two sentences: No stopping 7 a.m. to 9 a.m., 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., except Saturday and Sunday. Two-hour parking Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Los Angeles parking signs are notoriously hard to read, doubly so when you are behind the wheel of a car in bumper-to-bumper traffic. To alleviate some stress from the day of an average Angeleno driver, the Los Angeles Department of Transportation is conducting trials on a newly designed, easy-to-read parking sign.

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Occupied Ground: Parklets in Former Street Parking Coming to Los Angeles

The parklet movement is really starting to catch on with a pilot program in auto obsessed LA next.

The parklet movement is growing and Los Angeles is finally getting into the game. Not to be outdone by its neighbor to the north, the Southern California metropolis will soon join San Francisco as host to these pint-sized public spaces in an effort to cultivate a more pedestrian-friendly streetscape.

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The endless search for a parking spot in the city may be a thing of the past—in San Francisco, at least. After years of preparation, the city is now rolling out SFpark, a high-tech new system that will set the price of parking spots according to supply and demand.

To reduce congestion, San Francisco is aiming to have one spot open at all times on every block. Here's how the plan works: A network of wireless sensors lets the city keep track of which parking spots are empty. If a particular block never has available spots, the city raises the meter rates until it does. In places where parking is plentiful, rates fall. As an added bonus, this information-age system lets residents check the rates and availability of parking online before deciding to drive.

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