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Paul Ryan Speech Fact-Checks Turn Out to Be Decent Primer on Economic Issues

A lot of news organizations took issue with Paul Ryan's speech. So they had to explain everything succinctly and accessibly.

If this year's presidential election is going to be about the economy, what the candidates say about the economy will be pretty thoroughly scrutinized. That's why it's a little surprising that Paul Ryan, now officially the vice presidential nominee of the Republican Party, took such liberties with the truth in his speech last night.

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What Would America Look Like Under the GOP's Budget Plans?

They won't pass, but Paul Ryan and Pat Toomey's proposed budgets are the GOP's vision for the United States—and the center of its election strategy.


Last year, the federal budget fight made front-page news. At the center of national debate was whether the deficit was dooming our economy (it wasn't), or whether Planned Parenthood was the key to reducing the deficit (again, not so much). The heated debate brought us to the brink of a government shutdown.

This year, the budget push-and-pull is flying under the radar—at least for the time being. Neither the budget proposed by House budget committee chairman Paul Ryan (R-Wisconsin) last month, nor the similarly drastic plan suggested by Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pennsylvania) on Wednesday has any hope of passing, but their goals will undoubtedly shape the agenda of the 2012 election. And that's a scary thought.

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Guns vs. Schools: The Onion Satirizes Our National Spending Priorities

What if a Congressional Budget Office mistake accidentally shifted $80 billion from defense to education?

The education funding crisis facing our nation's schools has caught the attention of The Onion. In a new piece, "Budget Mix-Up Provides Nation's Schools With Enough Money To Properly Educate Students," their writers expertly skewer just how screwed up our national priorities really are—especially when it comes to defense funding and education funding.

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