GOOD

We're Not Your Model Minority: Asian American Education Groups Dispute Pew Report

Pew's report reinforces the stereotype that AAPI students are universally high achieving and on track for college.

It should be common sense that Asian American and Pacific Islander students are not universally high achieving and on the college track. But, thanks to the "model minority" stereotype—the myth that all Asians are highly educated and financially successful—the academic challenges that AAPI students face are frequently ignored. AAPI students encounter teachers who believe they're intrinsically smart, and any extra help they need will come from their parents—who are, of course, penning the sequel to Amy Chua's controversial Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother book. Well, according to several AAPI higher education organizations, the latest report from the Pew Research Center, The Rise of the Asian Americans, only serves to reinforce those damaging stereotypes.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Moving On Up to the Northeast Side: Where Can You Climb the Income Ladder?

It’s time to ask yourself if your career’s in the right place—not figuratively, but physically.


If you aim to climb the income ladder in the United States, your best bet might be to move north and east—and definitely stay out of the south.

A new study from the Pew Charitable Trusts Economic Mobility Project—check out the group's nice interactive map—compares the ability of people to increase their average earnings over time in all 50 states and regions across the country.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

The Democrats are set up to taking a beating in the mid-term elections. Every poll shows Republicans with a sizable lead in the generic ballot, i.e. "Would you vote for a generic Republican or a generic Democrat right now?" And, in most specific races, especially for the House, the Democrats are getting shellacked in the polls

But what if that is because pollsters aren't asking the right people? A new study out by Pew takes a look at pollsters' methods and finds something glaring: Most only call landlines. Who owns landlines? Old people. What political persuasion are old people, generally? Republicans. Young people—who are more liberal and who may still be specifically involved and engaged after the Obama campaign—tend to only have cell phones, at least in my experience.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles