GOOD

Drug “Sniffing” Bees Could Make Airport Security Dogs Obsolete

Trained honeybees may become the new face of law enforcement, as drug policy evolves beyond what canines can handle.

image via (cc) flickr user dni777

Scientists are abuzz with excitement after new research suggests dogs may not necessarily be the most effective animal drug detectors when it comes to sniffing out illicit hidden contraband. Dogs, it turns out, have a hard time adjusting to the shifting sands of drug legislation, in which things things like marijuana can suddenly become legal some places, while remaining illegal in others. The training involved in creating an effective drug-sniffing dog is time-intensive, expensive, and hard to un-learn, should the pooch need to pivot in response to evolving drug legislation. What’s more, as drug dogs operate in an inherently binary system with their human partners, there’s a risk for false-positive detection as the dog could be more influenced by its handler’s expectations than olfactory input.

Keep Reading
Articles

Taste of Tech: Biohacking the Future

How to make your own genetically modified seed—and what might happen if you do.

This Taste of Tech post is the fourth in a series exploring the science and technology of food in partnership with Gearfuse. Don't miss last week's post on the complicated relationship between industrial production lines and pure food by Matthew Battles.

Keep Reading
Articles