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Remembering Kennedy's Famous Berlin Speech 50 Years Later

50 years ago today, president John F. Kennedy made an impassioned speech in front of Berlin's city hall, declaring famously, "Ich bin ein Berliner."


50 years ago today, American President John F. Kennedy made an impassioned speech in front of Berlin's City Hall, declaring famously, "Ich bin ein Berliner" (I am a Berliner). The speech was watched by 1.1 million—more than 50 percent of Berlin’s population—and from the other side of the border, by small groups of East Berliners unable to even wave because of the presence of the East German People's Police. When Kennedy declared, "All free men, wherever they may live, are citizens of Berlin, and therefore, as a free man, I take pride in the words, 'Ich bin ein Berliner'," he gave a morale boost to West Germans who were still coping with the fact that the Wall had recently been erected.

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Video: Watch the Japanese Tsunami Sweep Away Dozens of Cars and Boats

Japanese TV captured the massive tsunami striking Sendai city.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WPFdGH-V1J8

Watch as Japanese NHK World TV captures the Japanese tsunami sweep away dozens of cars and plow upstream so hard it effectively reverses the flow of the river. This video is from the Miyagi Prefecture of Sendai city about an hour and a half after the 8.9 magnitude quake shook off the Pacific coast of Japan.

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Relish The Sight of Simple Change When a Line for a Bus Means Revolutionary Change in Egypt

In the smaller moments Egyptians are proudly revealing they have changed themselves, not just their government.


Egyptian revolutionary Wael Ghonim posted this shocking picture yesterday. It may not seem like much amidst all of the iconic images of tanks seeming gentle, scuba diving protesters, human shields, and children of Tahrir, but this little line for a microbus is a harbinger of the national rebrith in process, a blossoming of order out of national pride.

Under Mubarak boarding a bus required a few shoves, maybe a sharp elbow or two and sturdy footing. This sight of this calm, brotherly, alternative moved Ghonim to post the snapshot with this caption:

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