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Solving Silicon Valley’s Diversity Problem, One Fellow at a Time

Tech boot camp General Assembly offers scholarships for minorities and veterans. Three recent grads share what they learned.

Photo courtesy of General Assembly

All eyes were on Silicon Valley this past summer, not only for the latest and greatest tech innovations, but also for the latest (but not so great) indications that the industry’s diversity is sorely lacking. From Apple to Google to Facebook to Twitter, several companies publicly confessed that their employee bases are predominantly men, as well as largely white or Asian.

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Who Can Profit from Selling 1-Cent Books on Amazon? Robots.

What happens when attempts to game the used book market go wrong?

What do you call a thriving marketplace of robots buying nonexistent books from other robots for millions of dollars?

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The $25 Handheld Computer That Could Transform Technology Education

Raspberry Pi is designed specifically to teach computer programming to kids. Will schools get on board?


With jobs of the future skewing toward technology and engineering fields, educators are eager to teach tech literacy and basic programming skills in school. But any conversation about increasing computer-based learning inevitably comes down to money—laptops and tablets aren't free, and budgets are so tight that it’s not uncommon for a school to have 2,000 students using one computer lab. Cash-strapped school districts can't get serious about teaching computer science if they can't afford the equipment kids need to learn it.

But such financial hurdles could disappear thanks to Raspberry Pi, a new credit card-sized computer designed specifically to teach computer programming to students. The device is the brainchild of the Raspberry Pi Foundation, a U.K. charity that "exists to promote the study of computer science and related topics, especially at school level" and wants "to put the fun back into learning computing." The device is set to make its debut in December and will cost a mere $25 each.

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