GOOD

Pharrell and Timberland Turn Recycled Plastic Into Bee-Inspired Boots

The nature-friendly summer kicks have even been endorsed by the Queen Beyhive herself, Beyonce.

Just in time for summer, a buzzy new collaboration from Timberland and Pharrell Williams that’s also good news for nature’s tiniest friends. The boots, patterned to look like honeycombs and blades of grass, are produced with Bionic Canvas, a unique textile made from Bionic Yarn, a product co-created by Williams that utilizes organic cotton and recycled plastic bottles to produce a sustainable material. So far the boots have been a huge hit with trendsetters, including Beyoncé, who wore the shoes in her recent “Feeling Myself” music video with Nicki Minaj. Bee and Bey-friendly? We might just be feeling these kicks ourselves.

Keep Reading
Articles

Pharrell Williams is Making Garbage Look Good

“RAW for the Oceans” pairs Pharrell’s sense of style with cutting-edge recycling techniques to create eco-friendly fashion.

image via rawfortheoceans.g-star.com/

As an award winning producer and musician, Pharrell Williams works with some of the most talented artists in the entire music industry. As a fashion designer, though, Pharrell Williams works with garbage. Not high-fashion facsimiles of garbage, like Louis Vuitton’s two thousand dollar trash bag-esque purses.

Keep Reading
Articles

Duke and UNC Adopt Caps and Gowns Made Out of Recycled Plastic Bottles

Good news: A new fabric called GreenWeaver, spun from molten plastic pellets, is being used for the graduation gear by a growing list of schools.


Need another good reason to recycle your plastic bottles? They might end up as part of someone's graduation cap and gown outfit. The Virginia-based company Oak Hall Cap & Gown has long produced graduation gear, but in 2008, after realizing that schools are trying to become more environmentally responsible, it began developing a fabric called GreenWeaver that's spun from molten plastic pellets. Each gown uses an average of 23 post-consumer plastic bottles—even the bags the gowns come in are made out of recycled plastic.

According to GreenWeaver's Facebook page, five percent of colleges currently purchase the environmentally conscious caps and gowns. That translates into "310,000 graduates who have worn GreenWeaver resulting in 7,130,000 plastic bottles being removed from landfills."

Keep Reading
Articles