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Deep under Springfield, Missouri, lies a cheese cave of industrial proportions, a 2-million-square-foot refrigerated warehouse called Springfield Underground. Since 2008, Kraft Foods has rented 400,000 square feet of the repurposed limestone mine as a massive distribution center, from which to ship 680-pound, Velveeta-bright barrels of Oscar Meyer meats, Philadelphia cream cheese, Velveeta pasteurized processed cheeses, Jell-O, and Lunchables.

Unlike traditional cheese caves, which can impart the particular flavors of time and place—the unique combinations of bacteria, yeast, and mold that cheese makers call terroirWired magazine explains that in the case of Kraft's cave:

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Feast Your Eyes: Ice Cutting Machine

It's clear. It's forgettable. It wasn't always that way. Consider ice.



When Starbucks rolled out its Trenta this week, a number of commenters correctly pointed out that the 31 oz. drink contained ice cubes. Although I haven't tried one myself (and haven't been able to reach Starbucks), the Trenta probably has closer to 20 fluid oz. of iced coffee or iced tea—and might not actually equal the volume of your stomach.

Either way, it reminded me of something Mark Twain said (which Ben Schott and Andrew Beahrs both resurrected recently): "Only one thing... can be called by the wide name 'American.' That is the national devotion to ice-water."

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The (Hidden) Energy Costs in Energy-Efficient Fridges

David Owen argues that more efficient fridges doesn't always equal lowered energy use.

In light of GOOD's Energy Issue, I decided to look into how one household technology transforms our relationship with food:

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