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How to Rectify Our Military's Culture of Rape?

A new lawsuit alleges Defense Secretaries Robert Gates and Donald Rumsfeld have allowed rape to proliferate in our armed forces.

Seventeen litigants on Tuesday filed a lawsuit against Defense Secretary Robert Gates and his predecessor, Donald Rumsfeld, charging that the United States has allowed a dangerous rape culture to persist within our armed forces. As details emerge about the violent assault on CBS News' Lara Logan in Egypt, the fact is that violence against American women overseas is something that often hits rather close to home.

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Might Gays Be Better Soldiers?

Differences in homosexual brains suggest that gay soldiers might make for a sharper fighting force.


With the repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” looking imminent, the next question on America’s mind is what a military with openly gay soldiers will look like. Most experts, including Defense Secretary Robert Gates and Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Admiral Mike Mullen, believe that a repeal of the discriminatory law won’t at all endanger the military’s stability. And a large majority of enlisted troops agree with them. But what if a military that welcomes gays and lesbians with open arms doesn’t just not fall part, but actually shows remarkable improvement?

For decades now, scientists seeking to understand why people are gay have done neurological research on homosexual versus heterosexual brain patterns. Though these experiments might initially sound like phrenology, pseudoscientific hooey that attempted to predict mental ability based on the size and shape of the skull, in fact, they have been academic and replicable. And while there’s still no consensus as to what makes someone gay, the differences between gay and straight brains that these studies have uncovered are not insignificant.

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Guess How the Public Feels About Repealing "Don't Ask, Don't Tell"

Yesterday's Pentagon report that service members support repealing "don't ask, don't tell." Nate Silver looks into the public opinion polls.


In light of yesterday's Pentagon report that said most service members support repealing "don't ask, don't tell," Nate Silver looked into the public opinion polls to see how America at large feels.

The red line above represents the percentage of people who think gays and lesbians should be able to serve openly. The blue line represents the percentage of people (from the same group) who think gays and lesbians who don't disclose their orientation should be able to serve. The difference between the red and the blue line represents the people who disagree with the blue statement but agree with the red one.

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