GOOD

Yawning Billboard Gives Free Coffee to Groggy Commuters

Sleepy São Paulo residents are treated to a caffeinated jolt, thanks to innovative train-station advertising.

image via youtube screen capture

Morning commutes suck. Unless you’re one of the rare few who wake up each day energized and rarin’ to go, you’d probably much rather snuggle back into bed, than cram yourself into a crowded train car, or gas-break-gas your way through rush-hour traffic. Yes, morning commutes suck, and for most of us the only thing that seems to make the tiniest bit of difference is a jolt of caffeine to kick start your day.

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Getting Outside the Classroom in Brazil

São Paulo's journalism school proves that if you can tell a story you can control the world.

São Paulo's journalism school proves that if you can tell a story you can control the world.

When we communicate, we participate in the ongoing characterization of everything around us, allowing us to define our own reality, instead of having it dictated to us by others. Enois, a free journalism school in São Paulo, Brazil, is using this truth to spawn a new generation of cub reporters, teaching them to investigate the world they know, and helping them turn their findings into viable media projects like magazines, newspapers, and video documentaries. For its students, Enois supplements an ailing and underfunded Brazilian school system, providing not only an education in critical thinking, but also an afterschool job: Enois is a business, not an NGO, and its young journalists and designers are paid for their work.

“When they ask questions, everything changes—their posture, the way they think…,” says Nina Weingrill, co-founder of Enois, from her office in sunny downtown São Paulo. “One student came to us, and said ‘OK, I want to write an article about the bad teachers at school, because they suck,’” she remembers, laughing. “And we said, ‘OK, is that true? Do they suck, really? You have to investigate.’ So we asked him to find one teacher he could follow around throughout his whole day, through all the work that he has to do. Well, he saw how much the teacher suffered. From lack of structure, from being paid very low. He realized the scenario was not how he thought it was.”

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If you show up on a bike at one of a string of businesses in São Paulo, Brazil, you'll get a reward for leaving your car behind. A bar, two restaurants, a creperie, and a cake shop all offer treats for cyclists, ranging from fresh juice or mate to a free salad.

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